Showing 1 - 20 of 1656 Results

  • Thu Apr 28 2016

    Valley pest control worker mauled by pit bulls while on the job

    A valley pest control worker almost lost his hands in a recent dog attack. "I could start seeing all the tendons when I was moving my fingers and I could see the tendons moving with my own eyes, there was no skin left," said Scott Fieger of the violent attack. Fieger has been a pest control worker for 25 years. He didn't hear any dogs barking and the gate was unlocked, so he headed into the backyard of a home near Clayton Street and Lone Mountain Road in North Las Vegas on April 25 to spray like he was hired to. "These two loose pit bulls, the aggressors, they both came around and ...

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  • Wed Apr 27 2016

    Varroa Mite Infestation In US Worse Than Previously Believed: Multi-Year Study

    The first multi-year honeybee disease study in the United States has revealed that varroa mite infestations in the country are far worse than what was previously believed, as the population of the deadly pests is more abundant than ever. Scientists from the Department of Agriculture and the University of Maryland conducted the research to look into the ill effects of diseases that plague honeybees in the United States, including varroa mites, fungal gut parasites and several other debilitating viruses. Their results provided a crucial five-year baseline against which to track future tren...

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  • Wed Apr 27 2016

    Vegan restaurants struggle with quandary of pest control

    As more fine dining meat-free restaurants are cropping up, establishment owners are struggling to balance humane ways to kill unwanted pests and their no-kill values. Here, Melanie Cochran works the cash register at her vegetarian restaurant, The Wild Cow, in Nashville, Tenn. Mark Humphrey | AP Even the well-being of rats, roaches and spiders are a concern for animal activists. But they also pose ethical dilemmas for owners of vegan restaurants who need to keep those pests out of their kitchens while trying to abide by no-kill values. Melanie Cochran, owner of The Wild Cow Vegetarian ...

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  • Mon Apr 25 2016

    Bedbugs are drawn to certain colors, study finds

    (CNN)The next time you're packing for a trip, you might want to reach for your brightest-colored luggage. It could help keep bedbugs away. A new study finds that bedbugs -- just like flies and other insects -- have favorite colors. They really like dark red and black, and they shun dazzling white and bright yellow. Researchers placed bedbugs in Petri dishes that contained little bug-sized tents made of different colored paper. The bugs quickly crawled to the shelter, just as you would expect for insects that spend 90% of their lives hiding in cracks and crevices. But when given the ch...

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  • Fri Apr 22 2016

    Rats on AI’s Dreamliner cause flight nightmares

    It's the third time this year that an AI flight has had to be diverted, though Jet, Spice, Indigo fumigated by the same agency haven't faced rodent issues. A complaint has been lodged and a probe ordered. For the third time in three weeks, an Air India flight has had to be diverted because of a rat on a plane. Last Saturday, April 16, the Boeing 787 Dreamliner headed from Melbourne to Delhi had to make an unscheduled landing in Singapore. A mere five days prior Delhi travellers bound for Frankfurt were deplaned and on April 4, a Birmingham flight to Delhi also had an unannounced and unwe...

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  • Tue Apr 19 2016

    Insects Have Consciousness, Self-Awareness and Egos

    Insects are conscious, egocentric beings, according to a new paper that also helps to explain why and likely when consciousness first evolved. Recent neuroimaging suggests insects are fully hardwired for both consciousness and egocentric behavior, providing strong evidence that organisms from flies to fleas exhibit both. Consciousness comes in many levels, and researchers say that insects have the capacity for at least one basic form: subjective experience. “When you and I are hungry, we don't just move towards food; our hunger also has a particular feeling associated with it,” Col...

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  • Thu Apr 14 2016

    Why Bed Bugs Are Getting Harder to Kill

    Bed bugs are among the most dreaded pests we have to deal with, and they're proving to be a formidable foe. New research suggests that bed bugs are able to ward off insecticides by developing thicker skins. Bedrooms across the world are in the midst of a bed bug epidemic. This plague of bloodsucking parasites has caused incalculable discomfort and paranoia , leaving their unwary victims with irritated skin and a profound sense of the willies. Each year, the United States spends $250 million to combat the bugs, with little progress to show for it. Part of the problem has to do with thi...

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  • Wed Apr 13 2016

    Newspaper reporter, broadcaster and pest control worker ranked among the worst jobs of 2016

    Who has the worst job in America? According to CareerCast.com’s 28th annual Jobs Rated report’s 10 worst jobs list, it’s a newspaper reporter. The Jobs Rated report’s methodology analyzes each job’s environment (emotional, physical and hours worked), income (growth potential and salary), outlook (employment growth, income growth potential and unemployment), and 11 stress factors to determine which professions are among the least desirable. “A gradual decline in print publications at the turn of the century became a steep downturn for the past decade,” CareerCast writes in what is f...

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  • Wed Apr 13 2016

    University of Missouri Extension: How to deal with tunneling pests in your yard

    The days are getting warmer, which means destructive, furry varmints are busy tearing up lawns and damaging plants. It’s time once again for moles and voles to go after your lawn and garden. “A mole will generally remain underground and not come to the surface, but most people are familiar with the damage they do with their feeding tunnels and the molehills that they make,” said Brad Fresenburg, assistant professor of plant sciences for University of Missouri Extension. “Most homeowners will notice a network of tunnels that have these 1 1/2-inch- to 2-inch diameter holes where they...

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  • Tue Apr 12 2016

    Garden-care giant to drop chemicals linked to bee declines

    DENVER (AP) -- Garden-care giant Ortho said Tuesday that it will stop using a class of chemicals widely believed to harm bees as concerns rise about the health of the insects that pollinate a big portion of plants that people eat. The company plans to phase out neonicotinoids by 2021 in eight products used to control garden pests and diseases. It will change three products for roses, flowers, trees and shrubs by 2017 and other products later, said Tim Martin, vice president and general manager of Ortho, a division of Marysville, Ohio-based Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. The chemicals, called ...

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  • Mon Apr 11 2016

    You Can Help Stop These Deadly Mosquitoes

    Lions and tigers and bears, oh my! From rabid dogs and bats killing around 59,000 people a year to snake bites killing 100,000 and disabling many more, toothy vertebrates haunt humanity’s dreams for good reason. But death tolls from fanged beasts pale in comparison to the havoc mosquitoes wreak. Between malaria, dengue and yellow fever, the World Health Organization chalks up millions of annual deaths to the insect. One specific type of mosquito out of around 3,500 species, the Aedes aegypti spreads these diseases and has made headlines in the wake of increased microcephaly cases almost ...

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  • Sun Apr 10 2016

    Wildlife babies found alone rarely need our help

    From the UI Wildlife Medical Clinic Wildlife babies found alone rarely need our help Each spring, wildlife babies are taken from the wild by well-meaning people who believe the animals have been abandoned by their parents. Although it may be human nature to want to rescue an animal that looks like it needs help, the truth is wild babies rarely need human assistance. The Wildlife Medical Clinic at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine in Urbana wants people to know more about when and how to help wildlife babies. A wildlife baby that is not with its parent ...

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  • Sat Apr 9 2016

    When wasps ATTACK: Experts reveal why the evil insects target you, how to avoid being stung and whether killing one will cause an army to swarm

    If you've ever been stung by a bee or wasp, you might think the attack came out of nowhere, but bees and wasps will only sting when they feel threatened. They are social animals and often their attacks are as a response to a particular chemical given off by other members of their hive. Now the science behind these attacks have been explained in a video by The American Chemical Society. Scroll down for video Honeybees (pictured) and wasps will only sting when they feel threatened. They are social animals and often their attacks are as a response to a particular chemical given off...

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  • Thu Apr 7 2016

    Biomechanics team discovers how insects repair their 'bones'

    Biomechanics researchers from Trinity College Dublin have discovered how insects build internal bandages to repair their broken 'bones'. A DIY cuticle repair kit allows wounded insects to go about their day-to-day lives almost as efficiently as they would have done before meeting with mishap. When an insect cuts one of its legs, it kicks into repair mode by laying a patch of new cuticle underneath the affected area. This new cuticle effectively functions as a bandage, which seals the wound and provides structural strength where it is required. The study, which has just been published ...

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  • Tue Apr 5 2016

    Bird Control Company Explores New Markets

    Bird-X, the leading brand in humane bird control solutions, is breaking new ground in new markets. Chicago, IL (PRWEB) April 05, 2016 In their April 4th blog post, Bird-X detailed how breaking into new industries has brought many fresh opportunities for marketing their bird and pest control products. In February, Bird-X attended the Golf Industry Show in San Diego, where they soon found out just how important bird control is for golf course superintendents. The number one pest bird on golf courses is the Canada goose, which can produce around a pound each of droppings per day, and ...

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  • Tue Apr 5 2016

    Natural Pest Control Company Secures ‘Shark Tank’ Deal

    Wondercide founder and CEO Stephanie Boone and business partner and chief marketing officer Laura Alter appeared on ABC’s March 18 episode of Shark Tank. The duo was seeking $500,000 in exchange for 5% equity to grow retail distribution of its line of safe and effective pesticide alternatives for pets, people and property. Impressed by the preparation of the team, the success of the business and the effectiveness of the products themselves, Lori Greiner offered Wondercide $500,000 for 3% equity in the company and a 50-cent royalty on every unit sold until repaid, securing a $16.6 million va...

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  • Tue Apr 5 2016

    Study Examines Bed Bug Infestations in 2,372 Low-income Apartments in New Jersey

    By Hannah Foster “Sleep tight, don’t let the bed bugs bite!” It’s a phrase you have probably heard countless times, though you most likely didn’t take the mildly ominous bedtime expression too seriously. But lately, this saying may be a little too true for comfort, according to Dr. Changlu Wang and his team of researchers at Rutgers University. Bed bugs are parasitic insects, ranging in size from 1-7 mm. These critters are nocturnal and feast only on blood, using humans as their primary host, so the favorite bed bug refuge is tucked away in our beds and couches. Bed bugs are not known...

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  • Sun Apr 3 2016

    SMMUSD Adopts New Anti Bug Policy

    By Jane Wickline Board of Ed adopts a stronger policy on the use of pesticides After receiving some backlash for the way it handled the gopher crisis at Malibu High School, the SMMUSD board has adopted a stronger policy on the use of pesticides, banning the use of anticoagulants outright. The new statement makes it very difficult for the board to resort to poisons until greener methods of eradication are attempted. According to SMMUSD board member Craig Foster, this is a tremendous step in the right direction for the district. "The statement Carrie Upton and Janice Maez drafted ...

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  • Sat Apr 2 2016

    Student kills black widow spider at Allegany High

    CUMBERLAND — Allegany High School will be closed this weekend for a pest-control treatment after a student killed a poisonous spider in a girls' locker room. The black widow spider was killed Thursday. An emailed news release from Mia Cross, spokeswoman for Allegany County Public Schools, said a site inspection by a local pest control company found no other live spiders. Access to the locker room and gymnasium was restricted on Friday. There was no danger to students and staff, according to the news release. Black widows are shiny and identified by a red hourglass marking on the un...

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  • Thu Mar 31 2016

    Pest control worker charged with stealing from homes

    The list of charges is growing as more victims are discovered in the case of a pest control worker charged with stealing from customer homes. Matthew Blake remains in jail. Blake is a former exterminator with a local pest control company. Detectives have connected him with stolen goods found at a variety of local pawn shops. "He actually stopped and spoke to me after he had been in the room where he took the bracelet from. Like nothing had happened," said victim Karen Wong. Wong said she never would have suspected that her husband's gold bracelet would be stolen by a pest contro...

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