PESTS  >  PESTS IN THE NEWS
SHOWING 1 - 20 OF 1054 RESULTS
  • Wed Dec 17 2014

    New Guide Vows Productivity Boost for Pest Control Companies

    Quality Equipment and Spray CEO, Andrew Greess' New Book Addresses Pest Control Companies Biggest Profitability Killer – Equipment Failure (Newswire.net -- December 16, 2014) Phoenix, AZ -- Andrew Greess, creator of QSpray.com and CEO of Quality Equipment and Spray, has a message for pest control operations everywhere – Stop Misusing Your Equipment! That premise led Greess to a new book Stop Spraying Money Down the Drain where he takes a closer look at the ways pest control companies can reduce downtime and change their costs on an ongoing basis. Equipment Purchase Price Is Just the T...

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  • Wed Dec 17 2014

    Stored Product Pests

    Stored Product Pests Prevention, Detection, and Gatekeeping for Control With the amounts and types of food—both ingredients and finished product—that are stored at food and beverage processing plants, it is all too common for stored product pests to invade. Once in your warehouse, these beetles, weevils, and moths can cause extensive damage and product loss. This can be from contamination of the insects in the food; by their feeding on or boring into grains; or by what they leave behind such as webbing and fecal droppings. “The main damage these stored food pests cause is product l...

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  • Tue Dec 16 2014

    Insect Extravaganza! Poo-Eating Beetles, Transparent Butterflies, and More

    Earth is a planet of insects, the most successful creatures by far (if you want to get technical, though, Earth is really more a planet of bacteria, but they’re not animals and they’re hard to photograph, so whatever). The beetles alone make up one in four animal species on this planet. That’s not a typo. Bugs own the place. About the Series We spent three days touring through the specimen collections at the glorious California Academy of Sciences. In this five-part series, we’re bringing you the weirdest, rarest, most intriguing creatures that visitors never get to see. That can o...

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  • Tue Dec 16 2014

    Learn wildlife's winter signs to understand behaviors

    Learning to read tracks and signs in the winter snow enable you to understand the ways of many varieties of mammals and birds during the cold season. The winter snow that blankets fields, forests and wetlands is filled with stories. Like the pages of a book, you can learn to follow the signs and tracks of wildlife in winter to gain understanding of what the birds, mammals, insects and other creatures are up to during the winter season. There are stories of survival. Stories of the hunt. Stories of reproduction and nesting, which has already begun for some of Wisconsin's wildlife spec...

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  • Tue Dec 16 2014

    Year in review: Insect, bird evolution revisited

    Biologists in 2014 saw what an astronomical amount of data could do for evolutionary questions — and what it couldn’t. Bernhard Misof of the Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig in Bonn, Germany, and 100 coauthors, published an evolutionary family tree of insects and close relatives based on the subset of some 1,478 genes shared by 144 kinds of organisms (SN: 12/13/14, p. 8). This project, called 1KITE (for 1,000 Insect Transcriptome Evolution), arranged branches on the new tree in ways that looked familiar, but details of certain insect orders differed. Project coleader Karl K...

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  • Mon Dec 15 2014

    Since You Asked: Crows 'commute' to feeding grounds

    SINCE YOU ASKED Groups roost together at night Crows regularly commute to feeding areas in the day and return to roosting areas at night. The advice you guys give on ornithological questions is usually spot on. I am one of those people who enjoys relaxing on Roxy Ann Peak after a day's work. My question is about the 50 birds that begin noisily circling the top for an hour or two every evening. Are they crows or ravens? They seem to come from the north, and then at sunset they head off — often in a long line toward maybe Ashland. Where are they going? How smart do they have to be to...

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  • Sat Dec 13 2014

    Toxic nectar affects behaviour of insect pollinators.

    Natural toxins in nectar and pollen can poison insects and affect their memory, behaviour and reproductive success, researchers have found. Toxins in lupin pollen cause bumble bees to produce fewer offspring while chemicals found in rhododendron nectar are toxic to honeybees but not bumble bees, toxic effects that could be contributing to the worrying decline in pollinator species, researchers said. Professor Phillip Stevenson from the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew and Natural Resources Institute at the University of Greenwich with colleagues from Trinity College Dublin studied the impact on...

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  • Fri Dec 12 2014

    Houseplant pest control: the best ways to control mealybugs, scale and spider mites

    Houseplants When purchasing houseplants, look at the foliage carefully. Avoid plants with yellow leaves, brown leaf edges or spots which indicate the plant has been poorly cared for. Look for signs of scale, mealybugs or mites that could infest your other plants at home. (NOLA.com|The Times-Picayune archive) Indoor plants make our homes pleasant and attractive. They may even help remove pollutants from the air, making the indoor environment healthier. But keeping houseplants healthy can be a challenge. To thrive indoors (or at least survive), we must provide proper light and water....

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  • Fri Dec 12 2014

    Tohoku University team discovers blue light is effective at killing insects

    Earlier this year Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano, and Shuji Nakamura won the Nobel Prize in Physics for their development of an efficient blue light-emitting diode (blue LED). It was a well-deserved victory for the Japanese scientists whose invention continues to impact our lives in ways we often don’t even notice. It could be in the display you’re looking at right now or it could be helping some of the millions of people in parts of the world without electrical infrastructure get affordable lights for their homes. And now in a report published in Scientific Reports, a team of researche...

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  • Thu Dec 11 2014

    Turf and Ornamental Professionals Depend on Neonics

    In an extensive study of the diverse turf and ornamental industry, researchers found that neonicotinoids are the primary tools used by professionals to control destructive insect pests. A survey of pest management practices in greenhouses, nurseries, lawns, landscapes and trees reveals that neonicotinoids are the top-rated products to control the most important pests in each of these market segments. Turf and ornamental professionals fear the loss of these products would reduce the quality of their plants and services, increase costs and negatively impact their ability to manage pest resist...

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  • Wed Dec 10 2014

    Bed Bugs, Kissing Bugs Linked To Deadly Chagas Disease in U.S.

    Every year, the hearts of millions of Central and South Americans are quietly damaged by parasites. During the night, insects called kissing bugs emerge by the hundreds from hiding places in people’s mud and stick homes to bite their sleeping victims. The bugs defecate near the punctured skin and wriggling wormlike parasites in this poop may enter the wound and head for their victims' hearts. There, in about a third of victims, they damage the organs for decades before causing potentially lethal heart disease. Around 12,000 people worldwide die each year from the ailment, called Chagas dise...

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  • Tue Dec 9 2014

    Fantasy Football Expert Matthew Berry Hosts First-Ever Terminix Fantasy Exterminator League

    MEMPHIS, TN--(Marketwired - December 08, 2014) - If you're among the millions of fantasy football team owners who missed the playoffs, Terminix, the leading provider of termite and pest control services in the United States, is giving you another shot at winning. Today, Terminix launches the first-ever Terminix Fantasy Exterminator League, based on real data from 10 Terminix service professionals across the country. Now through Dec. 14, fantasy sports fans across the nation can draft their own team of pest control pros for a chance to win a $5,000 Big Game Giveaway. And to help promote t...

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  • Sun Dec 7 2014

    Pantry Pests Harbor Plastic-Chomping Bacteria

    Chemical & Engineering News Polyethylene is one of the most popular and, unfortunately, persistent types of plastics. Bags, bottles, and packaging made from the polymer accumulate in landfills and oceans across the globe. Scientists lament that microbes can’t chew up the plastic to render it harmless. However, a new study reports the first definitive molecular evidence that certain bacteria, found in the guts of a common pantry pest, can thrive on polyethylene and break it apart (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2014, DOI: 10.1021/es504038a). In the U.S. alone, consumers discard over 32 million...

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  • Sat Dec 6 2014

    Absurd Creature of the Week: This Is an Actual Insect. This Is Not a Joke

    Let’s just admit it: We all have body issues to some degree. I, for instance, was informed a few years back by a drunk lady in a bar that I am in fact slightly bow-legged, which was the first I’d heard of it. The revelation was enormous, and still remains a source of some anxiety for me. More absurd creatures: But our image issues are mere trifles compared to what must be going through the minds of the treehoppers. These are without a doubt nature’s most bizarre insects, having evolved into a huge range of shapes: some with jutting, curling heads, others that look like they have ants ...

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  • Thu Dec 4 2014

    Stanford says bedbug situation at dorm is under control - New York News

    STANFORD, Calif. (KTVU) - Stanford University officials say they now have a bedbug issue under control at one of the dorms there. Pest control experts have spent the last two months trying to eradicate the critters. They say there were three rooms affected this time. Though, this comes after the same dorm had a case of bedbugs last spring. "I didn't know what was going on. And then eventually I heard it was bedbugs and I was like oh my gosh this better not get to the second floor," says student Ryan Hermstein. Bedbugs, the small, biting pests, had moved in on the first floor of Toy...

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  • Tue Dec 2 2014

    Curious Scientific Names Can Make Insects Famous

    Thestral incognitus, named after the Thestrals in the Harry Potter saga. By Eduardo Faundez Scientific names — at least for plants and animals — are Latinized words, and the Latin language was selected for the naming of new organisms because it’s a dead tongue. Why choose a dead tongue? Here’s why: 1) A dead tongue is neutral because no one speaks it as their native language, and therefore no one gets any kind of linguistic advantage, and 2) a dead tongue does not evolve over time, which is a very important characteristic if we want the naming of species to be organized and stable....

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  • Thu Nov 27 2014

    Branson Riley Carlisle: Brown recluse spider kills Ala. boy within hours

    Branson Riley Carlisle, a young boy from Alabama, died after being bitten by a spider in his home. Branson was taken to the hospital within hours of the bite, but his condition deteriorated and eventually resulted in the young boy's death. Writes the Inquisitr on Nov. 26: “Branson Riley Carlisle, a 5-year-old boy from Albertville, Alabama, was bitten by a spider on Sunday morning. Though the boy’s family rushed him to a nearby hospital just hours after being bitten, Branson Carlisle passed away from the effect of the spider bite.” The spider that bit Branson was a brown recluse or fid...

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  • Wed Nov 26 2014

    Orkin's 50 worst cities for bed bugs

    If you travel, you might want to know about cities with bed bug problems. Orkin has come up with a list of the 50 worst cities, when it comes to bed bugs. The pest control company looked at the number of bed bug treatments it performed in each city from January to December 2013 and came up with this list. Florida has one city that made the list. Chicago Los Angeles Columbus, Ohio Detroit Cincinnati Cleveland/Akron/Canton Dayton Washington D.C. Denver Indianapolis Richmond/Petersburg, Va. Raleigh/Durham/Fayetteville, N.C. Dallas/Ft. Worth Syrac...

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  • Tue Nov 25 2014

    Self-Defense For Insect Eggs

    Insects are the most diverse group of animals on earth. They inhabit nearly all terrestrial habitats. One of the factors underlying this success is the ability of insect eggs to survive in adverse conditions. For a long time the ability to survive these adverse conditions has been attributed to maternal investment in the form of a protective eggshell. However, my research in the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) shows that contrary to common belief, insect eggs are far from helpless. The insect egg itself develops a cellular layer around the egg called the serosa. This serosa pro...

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  • Tue Nov 25 2014

    Vogue's Anna Wintour Pissed Off With New 1 World Trade Center Offices, Infested With Rats

    Anna Wintour, editor-in-chief on Vogue magazine is allegedly displeased with the publications's new 1 World Trade Center offices. Their new workplace at the 25th and 26th floors of the building is said to be infested with rats and vermins. Moving to this new offices may be postponed until the pests are cleared away. Reportedly, the new 1 WTC offices of Vogue magazine are being swarmed by rodents. Editor-in-child, Anna Wintour, is said to be naturally disgusted and would not step foot into the new offices until these rodents are removed. The report details that the influential editor-in-c...

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