Showing 1 - 20 of 1673 Results

  • Tue May 31 2016

    Formosan termites trigger fears of impending doom for homeowners in historic Riverside

    In historic Riverside, where meticulously preserved homes sit under a green veil of shade trees, the shocking announcement that the old Woman’s Club of Jacksonville building might be razed because of Formosan termites left nervous homeowners asking where the destructive termites would strike next. The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, which owns the Woman’s Club, had intended to restore the vacant building, but the museum dropped that plan and asked the Jacksonville Historic Preservation Commission to allow demolition of the structure, which is listed on the National Register of Historic P...

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  • Mon May 30 2016

    Termite, insect swarms across New Orleans picked up on meteorologists' radar

    Although meteorologists are accustomed to seeing bird flocks on their radar at sunrise, the National Weather Service reported the unusual appearance of insect swarms across the North Shore and south shore Sunday (May 29). Meteorologists noticed the activity earlier this evening and "are pretty sure" it represents insect swarms based on the time of the day that it occurred, meteorologist Alek Krautmann said. He said the radar usually shows signatures of bird flocks taking off over some of the major wetland areas around the south shore during sunrise. Meteorologists noticed shortly afte...

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  • Fri May 27 2016

    Man dies after being stung by bees more than 1,000 times in Arizona park

    What was supposed to be a short and easy hike ended in tragedy Thursday morning when a young man died after being stung more than 1,000 times by bees in an Arizona park. Alex Bestler, 23, was walking along Merkle Memorial Trail in Usery Mountain park near Mesa just before 9 a.m. when he and a friend were suddenly attacked by thousands of bees. "Without provocation or warning, a large swarm of bees descended on both of them as they continued on the trail," the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office said in a press release. Bestler's friend, identified in the release only as Sonya, was ahe...

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  • Wed May 25 2016

    Insects in Concord attack were regular honeybees, not killer bees

    The perpetrators of a hellacious rampage of stinging that killed two dogs and caused pandemonium in a Concord neighborhood this month were not Africanized killer bees after all, but regular neighborhood honeybees, state agricultural officials said Tuesday. Scientists at the California Department of Food and Agriculture tested the mitochondrial DNA of seven of the crazed bees that blanketed Hitchcock Road in Concord a little over a week ago and found only European genes. To be precise, the Concord bees were of the family Apidae, the genus Apis and the species mellifera, of the eastern ...

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  • Wed May 25 2016

    What social insects can teach us about resilient infrastructure

    Accidents, natural disasters and random or targeted attacks can cripple human infrastructure. Our transportation networks, supply chains and communication networks are increasing in size and becoming more complex as our populations grow. How do we protect those networks from becoming vulnerable and failing? Social insects may provide some inspiration. Social insects, such as ants, bees and wasps, live in a common nest site. They: work together to raise nest mates; have one (or a few) “queens”; have fertile females (the queens) that produce all of the nest mates; and have o...

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  • Mon May 16 2016

    A ‘sixth sense’ for humidity helps insects stay out of climatic trouble

    Humidity levels can mean life or death for insects. Hasna Lahmini, CC BY-NC The amount of water vapor in the air – humidity – profoundly alters our experience of the environment around us. A hot, dry morning in the desert of California feels miles apart from a hot, sticky one in the Cambodian jungle. People generally dislike hot and humid conditions for good reasons. Our bodies dissipate heat through evaporation of sweat from the skin surface. When humidity is high, this process is less effective, and more blood needs to be pumped to the skin for cooling. This results in fatigue and c...

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  • Mon May 16 2016

    New potentially deadly tick-borne diseases underscore need for tick checks and other prevention

    Dr. Catherine Cavanaugh, DO is an internal medicine physician, pediatrician and an infectious disease specialist. Courtesy photo A generation ago, black flies and mosquitoes were the worst pests Mainers faced in the spring. Today, blacklegged or deer ticks, which first arrived in the state in the 1980s, are present in most of Maine. Deer ticks carry Lyme disease, which can cause debilitating symptoms if not caught at an early stage, and babesiosis and anaplasmosis, which can cause flu-like symptoms and potentially be deadly to the very young, the very old or people with impaired immun...

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  • Mon May 16 2016

    Swift, Safe and Systematic Pest Control for Pets

    Flea and tick products formulated to treat the home keep pets safe while quickly eradicating infestations. The climate of Phoenix tends to discourage fleas and ticks—but the products needed to treat pest issues in the home still sit on the shelves of Noble Beast Natural Market for Pets. “When infestations do occur, our customers are not used to dealing with them and are usually a bit panicked by the situation,” said Marsha Vallee, co-owner. “Our customers want products that are nontoxic yet effective.” Ingredients that protect pets from harm yet eradicate stubborn pest infestations...

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  • Wed May 11 2016

    Killing Bugs And Making Money: The Saga Of David Royce

    In 2004 Brigham Young University student David Royce was working his third summer as a salesman and recruiter for Moxie, a Texas pest-control company. Royce had learned the art of persuading strangers as a Mormon missionary going door-to-door in Panama, and he was good at it. So good that, while still in college, he’d written Moxie’s sales training manual and been named a vice president of the company. So good that owner Jason Walton urged him to drop his plans to go to business school. “Don’t go pulling 80-and 100-hour weeks in investment banking,” Royce remembers Walton saying. “You shoul...

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  • Sat May 7 2016

    Wildlife specialist gives advice on removing pests

    Kansas State University wildlife specialist Charlie Lee spends most of his days dealing with problems caused by urban wildlife from pack rats and armadillos to rabbits and deer. The No. 1 ranking urban wildlife pest he has received complaints about the last two years are moles. “If you understand the biology of moles, you will understand why some things aren’t efficient for getting rid of moles,” Lee told area residents gathered at the Parsons Arboretum Friday for his seminar. Moles’ diets consist of insects and invertebrates such as earthworms and grubs, with their preference bein...

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  • Fri May 6 2016

    Gulf Coast could be ground zero for Zika

    The Gulf Coast may know hurricanes, but this year the region of 60 million people could find itself unprepared and at ground zero for a different type of storm: a mosquito-borne Zika epidemic. A look at the region's urban hubs, small towns and rural outposts shows a patchwork of preparedness. Cities such as Houston have robust plans in place, while smaller towns, such as Corpus Christi, Texas, struggle with fewer resources. The Gulf Coast's steamy climate, abundant mosquitoes and international airports create an environment ripe for the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which has spread to 3...

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  • Wed May 4 2016

    Infrequently Asked Questions: Why do so many bugs hit my windshield?

    The world is full of questions we all want answers to but are either too embarrassed, time-crunched or intimidated to actually ask. In the spirit of that shared experience, we've embarked on a journey to answer all of the questions that burn in the minds of Philadelphians — everything from universal curiosities (Why do disposable coffee cups still leak?) to Philly-specific musings (How does one clean the Liberty Bell?). If you've driven through a rural area, you're painfully familiar with the experience of having your squeaky clean car pelted by a smattering of insects, whose innards sud...

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  • Tue May 3 2016

    What Happened To The Mosquito-Zapping Laser That Was Going To Stop Malaria?

    Six years ago at TED, former Microsoft CTO and general genius Nathan Myhrvold demonstrated a "photonic fence" that uses lasers to track and obliterate disease-carrying mosquitoes. Everyone got so excited (even this site), about the potential of ending the malaria crisis with such a simple display of anti-mosquito aggression. Six years later, it seems that mosquitoes are still flying, unmolested by deadly lasers. So what happened to the idea? Did it fly, or enter the trash can of history? The answer is that the project is doing quite well—but perhaps not in the revolutionary manner ...

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  • Mon May 2 2016

    New Knowledge and a New Tool to Help Control Billbugs in Turfgrass

    By Leslie Mertz Turfgrass covers three times more land area than any other irrigated crop in the United States, and brings in tens of billions of dollars in annual revenues. Yet one of the major pests of this crop still remains a mystery in many parts of the country, according to Madeleine Dupuy, lead author of a new Journal of Integrated Pest Management article on this damaging insect. The insects are billbugs, a type of weevil that is found from southern Canada to Mexico, as well as parts of the Caribbean. “The information on billbugs is very regionally limited, so if you’re living ...

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  • Mon May 2 2016

    Researchers team up with viruses to evolve a better insecticide | ExtremeTech

    Evolution never really sits still. Under selective pressure, like an insect being exposed to pesticides, life does what it does best: figure out how to persist through adversity. Insects are becoming resistant to our pesticides faster than we can come up with new ones. Worse, some pesticides have downstream effects we didn’t plan for — q.v. our continuing refinement of allowable agricultural use of neonicotinoids in light of their apparent effect on bees. Bacillus thuringiensis makes a selective, relatively safe insecticide, to which insects are becoming less and less susceptible. So wha...

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  • Sat Apr 30 2016

    What’s the Most Painful Sting? An Interview with ‘the King of Sting’

    I met entomologist Justin Schmidt by chance in an Arizona ghost town. I was there to write a story about how the monsoon brings out tons of bizarre-looking creatures and the naturalists who chase them. Schmidt, one of those colorful bug-lovers, was relaxing with his family and, of course, running after insects. Cow-killers, to be exact. These red, fuzzy-looking wasps are renowned for their painful stings. But exactly how painful? And how does this compare with something more common, like a honeybee? Well, thanks to Schmidt, now we know. The entomologist created the Schmidt Sting Pain ...

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  • Fri Apr 29 2016

    Auditors say Albuquerque company overcharged the city

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) – The city thinks it has finally gotten rid of a pesky problem concerning a pest control company it used for nearly 20 years. KRQE News 13 learned the city of Albuquerque ditched B&Y Pest Control over fears it had been cheating the city. According to a recent audit, a handful of city departments suspected the company of “inaccurate billings, unperformed services, and falsified records.” The audit also stated the city paid B&Y more than $105,000 for pest control services during the 18 month audit period. The audit lasted from July 1, 2013 to December 31, 201...

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  • Thu Apr 28 2016

    Valley pest control worker mauled by pit bulls while on the job

    A valley pest control worker almost lost his hands in a recent dog attack. "I could start seeing all the tendons when I was moving my fingers and I could see the tendons moving with my own eyes, there was no skin left," said Scott Fieger of the violent attack. Fieger has been a pest control worker for 25 years. He didn't hear any dogs barking and the gate was unlocked, so he headed into the backyard of a home near Clayton Street and Lone Mountain Road in North Las Vegas on April 25 to spray like he was hired to. "These two loose pit bulls, the aggressors, they both came around and ...

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  • Wed Apr 27 2016

    Varroa Mite Infestation In US Worse Than Previously Believed: Multi-Year Study

    The first multi-year honeybee disease study in the United States has revealed that varroa mite infestations in the country are far worse than what was previously believed, as the population of the deadly pests is more abundant than ever. Scientists from the Department of Agriculture and the University of Maryland conducted the research to look into the ill effects of diseases that plague honeybees in the United States, including varroa mites, fungal gut parasites and several other debilitating viruses. Their results provided a crucial five-year baseline against which to track future tren...

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  • Wed Apr 27 2016

    Vegan restaurants struggle with quandary of pest control

    As more fine dining meat-free restaurants are cropping up, establishment owners are struggling to balance humane ways to kill unwanted pests and their no-kill values. Here, Melanie Cochran works the cash register at her vegetarian restaurant, The Wild Cow, in Nashville, Tenn. Mark Humphrey | AP Even the well-being of rats, roaches and spiders are a concern for animal activists. But they also pose ethical dilemmas for owners of vegan restaurants who need to keep those pests out of their kitchens while trying to abide by no-kill values. Melanie Cochran, owner of The Wild Cow Vegetarian ...

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