Showing 61 - 80 of 1862 Results

  • Fri Nov 4 2016

    What FSMA means for pest management

    America’s food processors play a crucial role in ensuring the safety of the food supply. The Food Safety Modernization Act of 2011 established Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls (HARPC) as the standard approach for food processors’ written food safety plans, and it has revolutionized the way that food processors look at food safety. HARPC is fundamentally a shift in approach from reactive to proactive protection of food products, especially when it comes to pests. Food processing facilities provide everything that pests need to survive: food and water, shelter and warmth....

    View Full Article
  • Mon Oct 31 2016

    Insects Are Scary Because Your Brain Confuses Disgust With Fear

    Why let creepy clowns get all the attention? From now until Halloween, Science of Us is investigating the psychology behind some of the most common fears. In a 2013 interview with Popular Science, ecologist Jeffrey Lockwood, author of The Infested Mind, recalled a time when he found himself caught in a massive grasshopper swarm: “I had worked with insects for years and grasshoppers for a very long period,” he said, “but [in this instance] their numbers and behavior and their overwhelming capacity conspired to generate a panic attack, which was extremely disturbing for me. I’d never had s...

    View Full Article
  • Sat Oct 29 2016

    What's going on under your lawn? Incredible pictures reveal elaborate maze of tunnels under neatly manicured layer of turf

    These amazing pictures reveal the chaos caused by a single mole under a neatly manicured layer of turfed lawn. Photos of the maze of tunnels in a garden in Bristol - which look like an elaborate art installation - were captured by pest control expert Adam Leonard. He went on to catch the mole with his bare hands - for the first time in his 22-year career. Mr Leonard said: 'Most people only realise they've got moles when they break through the surface and leave those little piles of earth. 'But they do untold damage to a nice lawn without doing that. 'The neatly-laid turf is p...

    View Full Article
  • Wed Oct 26 2016

    Global Market Study on Pest Control Products and Services: North America Expected to be the Most Attractive Regional Market

    The global pest control products and services market is expected to exhibit a healthy CAGR of 5.4% accounting for $28.6 billion in the forecast period from 2016 to 2026, according to a recent report from Persistence Market Research. Globally, the market growth of pest control products and services is driven by a quickly growing urban population worldwide beside surge in the pest population, mainly attributed towards accessible food sources for conducive living habitats and small organisms. In developed as well as developing countries, increasing awareness about health & hygiene among con...

    View Full Article
  • Wed Oct 26 2016

    The Bug That Stalks Spiders on Their Own Webs

    Spiders don’t make for easy prey. They are almost all venomous and almost all predatory. Many build webs whose silken lines ensure a sticky end for blundering insects. And those webs are, in a very real way, extensions of the spiders: By carrying the telltale vibrations of intruders, they act as both burglar alarm and death trap. So it’s a bold kind of insect that hunts spiders for a living, a positively foolhardy one that hunts them on their own webs, and a seemingly suicidal one that does so on foot. And yet, that’s exactly what the giraffe-necked assassin bug does. It’s a bizarr...

    View Full Article
  • Wed Oct 26 2016

    Zika virus 'not controllable': CDC director's grim warning

    MIAMI — The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention delivered a grim assessment Tuesday of the government's ability to contain Zika, saying it's too late to stop the dangerous virus from spreading throughout the United States. "Zika and other diseases spread by (the Aedes aegypti mosquito) are really not controllable with current technologies," CDC Director Thomas Frieden said. "We will see this become endemic in the hemisphere." Speaking at the CityLab 2016 conference in this southern city, Frieden encouraged mayors and city officials in attendance to bolster mosqu...

    View Full Article
  • Tue Oct 25 2016

    Rodent buffet: How Phoenix uses birds of prey to kill pests

    Ed Checkley scoured the bottom of a dry water-retention basin in northeast Phoenix recently, looking for the remains of rodents killed by the city's newest pest-control agents: hungry raptors. It's just after sunrise as Checkley uses a snake stick to poke around in the dirt for evidence of any raptor activity. No vermin debris this morning, but hoof prints offer a clue that javelinas have stopped by to help clean up. A few years ago, the city struggled to control an infestation of ground squirrels near 32nd Street and State Route 51. The burrowing rodents destroyed a nearby earthen da...

    View Full Article
  • Sun Oct 23 2016

    Bedbugs a growing problem in the Inland Northwest

    Getting rid of one bedbug is simple – just squish it with your finger. But getting rid of a lot of bedbugs? That’s tricky. Just ask Jason and Serenity Longacre, who live in a house with three family friends, three dogs, three cats, a bearded dragon and a snake. Their home, which they acknowledge is quite messy, is a rental in the Shadle area, sandwiched between more expensive homes with nice yards and clean porches. Several months ago, the Longacres and their guests started noticing red marks on their arms and legs that itched like mosquito bites. Then they noticed the dogs digging...

    View Full Article
  • Wed Oct 19 2016

    Anthranilic Diamides Can Potentially Replace Neonicotinoid Seed Treatments in Vegetable Crops

    By Rebecca A. Schmidt-Jeffris and Brian A. Nault When used as foliar sprays, neonicotinoids have caused some concern among the general public because — like any pesticide — they can harm bees and other beneficial insects. However, using neonicotinoids as seed treatments minimizes these risks, and has become a commonly used tool for proactively protecting crops from insect damage. These seed treatments have benefits that include relatively low costs, low mammalian toxicity, and reduced worker handling of pesticides. Within the processing vegetable industry, crops like snap bean are typ...

    View Full Article
  • Tue Oct 18 2016

    Biblical plague? Aphids swarm Utah County

    If you have noticed swarms of gnat-like insects in Utah County, you are not alone. Utah State University recently released a statement after its Extension Office in Utah County received concerned calls from throughout the county describing "clouds of flying insects in the millions or 'zillions.'" People reported the swarms as seeming as if they were a biblical plague. “Many people have mistaken these flying insects for gnats or tiny flies, but from the samples we’ve seen, aphids are the culprit,” said Meredith Seaver, a USU horticulture assistant, in an email. Though the numbers of...

    View Full Article
  • Tue Oct 18 2016

    Chicago Ranked ‘Rattiest’ City By Pest Control Company

    (CBS) — Chicago has re-claimed a title it held in 2014: The “rattiest” city in America, so determined by Orkin pest control. The No. 1 ranking is based on the number of rodent control treatments the company has performed — both residential and commercial. Chicago’s Department of Streets and Sanitation wouldn’t respond directly to Orkin’s rat ranking. But spokeswoman Jennifer Martinez did say the city itself has gotten more calls so far this year than the previous time frame last year. “We have received about 30 percent more calls for rodents, this year over last,” she says. Mart...

    View Full Article
  • Tue Oct 18 2016

    Skunks stinking up several areas in Albuquerque

    VIDEO There are stinky little pests popping up in parts all over Albuquerque. Sometimes you might not see them, but you’ll smell one if they’re around. The Christopher family lives just north of the downtown area of Albuquerque. It has decided to turn the Christopher family’s backyard into its own personal corridor, according to Kurt Christopher. "It was late at night. We had the windows open. I heard scratch, scratch at night and I came down,” he said. “I thought it was a cat, and so I come down and I turn on the light and it’s right there. And my wife shouts, ‘Don’t scare it.’” ...

    View Full Article
  • Tue Oct 18 2016

    Small Island, Big Experiment

    The first thing Billy Ryan does after he arrives at work most mornings is drive to a yacht club or construction company lot, crawl into a mangrove, and stand for 60 seconds to count the mosquitoes that land on him. If there are five or more, he’ll request that a crew come spray the area the next day.1 From there, the 56-year-old inspector with the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District will visit commercial and residential properties, hunting for standing water and the mosquito larvae and pupae that are frequently found within it. On a Thursday morning in late August, he made his way to ...

    View Full Article
  • Mon Oct 17 2016

    New way to fight mosquitoes puts focus on human "flavors"

    Rather than spraying neighborhoods with pesticides or dousing ourselves with chemical repellents to ward off mosquitoes, wouldn’t it be great if the insects simply didn’t like how humans tasted and left us alone? That’s the concept behind some new research from scientists at Johns Hopkins University. They’re studying how the brains of mosquitoes process tastes and smells, in hopes of identifying a way to make “human flavor” distasteful to mosquitoes. Their work, published online in the journal Nature Communications, focuses on Anopheles gambiae, a type of mosquito that carries malaria...

    View Full Article
  • Fri Oct 14 2016

    Fighting cockroaches, other pests big budget task for community housing corporation

    The corporation overseeing the city’s low-income housing properties spends more than $300,000 a year fighting cockroaches, bed bugs and other pests. The Windsor-Essex Community Housing Corporation’s pest fighting budget will likely increase to $426,000 next year, with the biggest single amount going to Ouellette Manor, where some residents are feeling overrun by cockroaches this week. Spokeswoman Kari Schofield said high resident turnover rates, particularly in Ouellette Manor at 920 Ouellette Ave., is one of the biggest factors fuelling the persistent pest problem. “I would sugges...

    View Full Article
  • Fri Oct 14 2016

    Westland library putting the heat on bed bugs

    Bed bugs. Just mentioning the little critters can make most people's skin crawl. "I get calls every day on bed bugs — it's very common. They are like hitchhikers. You have them or someone who comes over brings them," said Jeff Granger, owner of the Pest Doctor in Westland. "If they aren't treated, they climb and wait for the next person." Unlike those other creepy crawlies — head lice — bed bugs don't generally set up house on people. "They are mostly on your clothing — they feed and get off. They could be under a collar. Mostly you get them in bed — that's where you get the name,"...

    View Full Article
  • Thu Oct 13 2016

    LSU departments team up to tackle insects in on-campus housing

    Armed with magnifying glasses, flashlights and vials of alcohol, graduate students in the LSU College of Agriculture Department of Entomology searched a common area of a residence hall on the LSU campus. The Department of Entomology is collaborating with LSU Residence Life to combat insects in and around the halls and apartments that house nearly 6,000 LSU students. Gregg Henderson, an urban entomologist with the LSU AgCenter, said the graduate students handle insect issues reported inside or around residence halls and apartments. “What we do is come in and inspect and identify ins...

    View Full Article
  • Wed Oct 12 2016

    Fall Can be a Batty Time for Schools

    By Marcia Anderson Just as children around the nation are back in school in the early fall, so are bats. Autumn is the time when many North American bats are beginning their trek south to overwinter in Mexico and Central America. Many schools are located along bat migration routes, so every fall, bats attempt to use them as rest stops. Bats are essential to maintaining healthy ecosystems and economies. Some bats are primary pollinators of fruits and other produce. They spend their nights eating pests — mosquitoes, moths, as well as termites, ants and roaches in flight. A single Mexica...

    View Full Article
  • Wed Oct 12 2016

    How much of your tax dollars keep Hawaii jails, prisons pest-free

    From roaches to rodents, no one likes it when creepy, crawly pests make a house in their home. It can cost hundreds, even thousands of dollars to pay a professional to get rid of them. But did you know more than a hundred thousand dollars are being spent each year to keep our prisons and jails pest-free? That bill is paid for by your tax dollars, so where exactly is all that money going? Oahu Community Correctional Center in Kalihi is the largest jail in Hawaii. It houses more than 1,100 people, and that’s where most your money goes when it comes to stamping out pests in the pri...

    View Full Article
  • Wed Oct 12 2016

    Mosquito-eating fish being used to get rid of the pests

    VIDEO By next spring mosquito control officials in Mobile County say they will provide Gambusia fish in our area. Meanwhile the fish is currently being used in Escambia County, Florida. ESCAMBIA COUNTY, Fla. (WPMI) — As mosquito season winds down there are plenty of wys to keep them away from you: bug spray, larvicide, all contain chemicals. There is now a natural way to say no to mosquitoes, and the answer is fish. Gambusia fish are small, aobut 55 millimeters, but their appetite is big. Mosquito larvae is a favorite snack for the fish. They can eat up to 500 a day. Gambusia...

    View Full Article