Showing 61 - 80 of 1850 Results

  • Tue Oct 18 2016

    Small Island, Big Experiment

    The first thing Billy Ryan does after he arrives at work most mornings is drive to a yacht club or construction company lot, crawl into a mangrove, and stand for 60 seconds to count the mosquitoes that land on him. If there are five or more, he’ll request that a crew come spray the area the next day.1 From there, the 56-year-old inspector with the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District will visit commercial and residential properties, hunting for standing water and the mosquito larvae and pupae that are frequently found within it. On a Thursday morning in late August, he made his way to ...

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  • Mon Oct 17 2016

    New way to fight mosquitoes puts focus on human "flavors"

    Rather than spraying neighborhoods with pesticides or dousing ourselves with chemical repellents to ward off mosquitoes, wouldn’t it be great if the insects simply didn’t like how humans tasted and left us alone? That’s the concept behind some new research from scientists at Johns Hopkins University. They’re studying how the brains of mosquitoes process tastes and smells, in hopes of identifying a way to make “human flavor” distasteful to mosquitoes. Their work, published online in the journal Nature Communications, focuses on Anopheles gambiae, a type of mosquito that carries malaria...

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  • Fri Oct 14 2016

    Fighting cockroaches, other pests big budget task for community housing corporation

    The corporation overseeing the city’s low-income housing properties spends more than $300,000 a year fighting cockroaches, bed bugs and other pests. The Windsor-Essex Community Housing Corporation’s pest fighting budget will likely increase to $426,000 next year, with the biggest single amount going to Ouellette Manor, where some residents are feeling overrun by cockroaches this week. Spokeswoman Kari Schofield said high resident turnover rates, particularly in Ouellette Manor at 920 Ouellette Ave., is one of the biggest factors fuelling the persistent pest problem. “I would sugges...

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  • Fri Oct 14 2016

    Westland library putting the heat on bed bugs

    Bed bugs. Just mentioning the little critters can make most people's skin crawl. "I get calls every day on bed bugs — it's very common. They are like hitchhikers. You have them or someone who comes over brings them," said Jeff Granger, owner of the Pest Doctor in Westland. "If they aren't treated, they climb and wait for the next person." Unlike those other creepy crawlies — head lice — bed bugs don't generally set up house on people. "They are mostly on your clothing — they feed and get off. They could be under a collar. Mostly you get them in bed — that's where you get the name,"...

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  • Thu Oct 13 2016

    LSU departments team up to tackle insects in on-campus housing

    Armed with magnifying glasses, flashlights and vials of alcohol, graduate students in the LSU College of Agriculture Department of Entomology searched a common area of a residence hall on the LSU campus. The Department of Entomology is collaborating with LSU Residence Life to combat insects in and around the halls and apartments that house nearly 6,000 LSU students. Gregg Henderson, an urban entomologist with the LSU AgCenter, said the graduate students handle insect issues reported inside or around residence halls and apartments. “What we do is come in and inspect and identify ins...

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  • Wed Oct 12 2016

    Fall Can be a Batty Time for Schools

    By Marcia Anderson Just as children around the nation are back in school in the early fall, so are bats. Autumn is the time when many North American bats are beginning their trek south to overwinter in Mexico and Central America. Many schools are located along bat migration routes, so every fall, bats attempt to use them as rest stops. Bats are essential to maintaining healthy ecosystems and economies. Some bats are primary pollinators of fruits and other produce. They spend their nights eating pests — mosquitoes, moths, as well as termites, ants and roaches in flight. A single Mexica...

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  • Wed Oct 12 2016

    How much of your tax dollars keep Hawaii jails, prisons pest-free

    From roaches to rodents, no one likes it when creepy, crawly pests make a house in their home. It can cost hundreds, even thousands of dollars to pay a professional to get rid of them. But did you know more than a hundred thousand dollars are being spent each year to keep our prisons and jails pest-free? That bill is paid for by your tax dollars, so where exactly is all that money going? Oahu Community Correctional Center in Kalihi is the largest jail in Hawaii. It houses more than 1,100 people, and that’s where most your money goes when it comes to stamping out pests in the pri...

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  • Wed Oct 12 2016

    Mosquito-eating fish being used to get rid of the pests

    VIDEO By next spring mosquito control officials in Mobile County say they will provide Gambusia fish in our area. Meanwhile the fish is currently being used in Escambia County, Florida. ESCAMBIA COUNTY, Fla. (WPMI) — As mosquito season winds down there are plenty of wys to keep them away from you: bug spray, larvicide, all contain chemicals. There is now a natural way to say no to mosquitoes, and the answer is fish. Gambusia fish are small, aobut 55 millimeters, but their appetite is big. Mosquito larvae is a favorite snack for the fish. They can eat up to 500 a day. Gambusia...

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  • Wed Oct 12 2016

    Parasite that can eat pets alive resurfaces in Florida

    KEY LARGO, Fla. A narrow ribbon of road linking the Florida Keys with the mainland is the front line in a renewed fight against maggots that can eat livestock and pets alive. Near a Key Largo visitors’ center painted with larger-than-life tropical fish and sea turtles, northbound drivers with animals must stop for agriculture officials checking for signs of New World screwworm. The parasite once cost the U.S. livestock industry millions every year. There hadn’t been a U.S. infestation in over 30 years, until the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed Sept. 30 that screwworm was kill...

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  • Sun Oct 9 2016

    USF says pest problem under control

    Cockroach sightings prompted health inspectors to temporarily close two University of Saint Francis dining halls in recent days. The campus food facilities, in Trinity Hall and the Pope John Paul II Center, reopened after being treated, according to the school and health records. Two dead roaches and mouse droppings were also found in a Subway on campus, but it was allowed to remain open after a follow-up inspection found no pests, Fort Wayne-Allen County Department of Health records state. During the closures, students were offered free food by USF, said Andrew Prall, vice president ...

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  • Mon Oct 3 2016

    FDA warning letters: Pests, seafood HACCP issues, drug residues

    The most recently posted food-related warning letters from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration went to a sprout operation, two seafood importers, a seafood processor and two dairy farms. Chicago’s Indoor Garden was sent a warning letter on March 25 regarding an inspection FDA conducted from May 11-14, 2015, at the company’s sprout operation at 4459 Division St. in Chicago. “During the inspection, we documented insanitary conditions and practices that render your green sprouts, wheatgrass, sunflower greens, pea shoots, and sprouted beans adulterated” under the Federal Food, Drug, and...

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  • Sun Oct 2 2016

    Know the signs of life-threatening anaphylaxis from ‘bee sting allergies’

    As summer gives way to crispness in the air, Southerners fill the time before winter with picnics, hiking and sporting events. Flying, stinging insects are getting more active, too, leaving people who might not realize they have life-threatening allergies vulnerable to stings. “Fall in the South is an ideal time for dinners on the deck, outdoor concerts and football games. But those are all areas that attract yellow jackets, wasps and other scavenger insects that are more aggressive this time of year,” said Stokes Peebles, M.D., of the Vanderbilt Asthma, Sinus and Allergy Program. “While...

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  • Sun Oct 2 2016

    Rooting out the rats: Pests making inroads into Yuma region

    Roof rats, a pest reportedly spreading throughout the Phoenix metro area, have also made serious inroads into Yuma over the last few years, setting up shop in yards or, in the unluckiest cases, nesting inside houses and leaving a costly mess on the owner's hands. Known for their ability to climb trees to reach citrus and other fruit, as well as the roofs of neighboring buildings, the rats are notoriously difficult to eradicate from an area once they're established because of their ability to stay out of the reach of predators. They can slip through holes in walls as small as half an inch...

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  • Sat Oct 1 2016

    Health Canada launches inspections database for pesticide companies

    Health Canada has announced that information on inspections of companies that manufacture pest control products will now be available to the public in an online database. Canadians can search the Pest Control Registrant Inspections Database for specific inspection findings, as well as summary report cards from inspections and information about companies' history of compliance with the Pest Control Products Act and its Regulations. The launch of the Pest Control Products Registrant Inspections Database is a milestone under Health Canada's Regulatory Transparency and Openness Framework ...

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  • Sat Oct 1 2016

    Lake Forest Elementary employees putting out pest traps to find source of skin irritations

    Saddleback Valley Unified School District staff members planned to place pest control traps around the Lake Forest Elementary School campus in an ongoing attempt to identify the source of skin irritations – possibly bug bites – on students and staff, district officials said Friday. The traps will be placed instead of a second round of pesticide spraying and the school has closed the fields on campus. “Our agency partners have not approved any additional spraying of pesticide until the source of the problem has been identified,” Tammy Blakely, assistant to superintendent Clint Harwick,...

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  • Fri Sep 30 2016

    Birth Control Meets Pest Control in Food and Beverage Plants

    The harbor in Hamilton, Ontario, links the city to Lake Ontario and to the St. Lawrence Seaway and the world. It’s a great transport option for food commodities like sugar. Sugar in supersacks and in bulk arrive on one Hamilton pier, where end loaders convey 25,000 tons a year to a warehouse and deposit it on the floor in mounds topping 6 ft. in height. The raw sugar will later be pasteurized and filtered to 99.5 percent purity before being converted to liquid sugar, primarily for use in carbonated soft drinks. The facility is BRC certified, proof that a pest control program is in pla...

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  • Fri Sep 30 2016

    California proposes pesticide buffer zones around schools and day cares

    Crop dusting and many other forms of pesticide spraying will be banned within a quarter of a mile of schools and child day-care centers during the bulk of daylight hours, under a rule proposed by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. The proposed regulation, which would take effect next September, is the first statewide rule governing how pesticides can be applied in areas where farms lie close to facilities where children congregate. It would affect about 3,500 schools and day-care facilities and involve about 2,500 growers in California, according to the department. “Th...

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  • Fri Sep 30 2016

    West Nile cases in area limited to animals, insects so far

    There has been West Nile virus activity in the Champaign County area since late July, but the only positive test results this year have turned up in dead birds and mosquito batches. The state on Wednesday reported three West Nile-related deaths, all in Cook County. Those three people tested positive this month, and were among 64 human cases of West Nile in the state to date this year. Statewide, 52 counties, including Champaign, have had the virus appear in birds, mosquitoes, horses and/or people, according to the Illinois Department of Public Health. Elsewhere in East Central Illi...

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  • Thu Sep 29 2016

    Mystery rash at elementary school: Dozens attacked by ‘biting, stinging insects’ in Lake Forest

    Was your kid a rash victim at an Orange County school? A recent rash outbreak at a Lake Forest elementary school where students and staff have been afflicted prompted live pest testings Wednesday, a spokeswoman for Saddleback Valley Unified School District said. The source of the rashes is a serious whodunit, said Jared Dever of the Vector Control District. “Dozens of traps have been laid for the past week and a half,” he said. “What we’re looking for is a wide variety of biting or stinging insects.” After an initial investigation of the campus, “we ruled out mosquitoes and othe...

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  • Wed Sep 28 2016

    Miami-Dade County Releases Sites Where Zika Mosquitoes Captured on Miami Beach

    Miami-Dade County officials have released the locations of mosquito traps that captured Zika-positive insects in Miami Beach. Five locations - 932 Lenox Avenue, 1619 Meridian Avenue, 2000 Convention Center Drive, 2378 Prairie Avenue and 1236 Drexel Avenue - tested positive for Zika after mosquito traps were placed there, Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control officials said Wednesday. Each location tested positive only once, on August 22nd and 23rd and September 4th and 9th, officials said. Later tests on mosquitoes trapped at the locations turned up negative for Zika. "What's importan...

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