Showing 61 - 80 of 1841 Results

  • Sun Oct 9 2016

    USF says pest problem under control

    Cockroach sightings prompted health inspectors to temporarily close two University of Saint Francis dining halls in recent days. The campus food facilities, in Trinity Hall and the Pope John Paul II Center, reopened after being treated, according to the school and health records. Two dead roaches and mouse droppings were also found in a Subway on campus, but it was allowed to remain open after a follow-up inspection found no pests, Fort Wayne-Allen County Department of Health records state. During the closures, students were offered free food by USF, said Andrew Prall, vice president ...

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  • Mon Oct 3 2016

    FDA warning letters: Pests, seafood HACCP issues, drug residues

    The most recently posted food-related warning letters from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration went to a sprout operation, two seafood importers, a seafood processor and two dairy farms. Chicago’s Indoor Garden was sent a warning letter on March 25 regarding an inspection FDA conducted from May 11-14, 2015, at the company’s sprout operation at 4459 Division St. in Chicago. “During the inspection, we documented insanitary conditions and practices that render your green sprouts, wheatgrass, sunflower greens, pea shoots, and sprouted beans adulterated” under the Federal Food, Drug, and...

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  • Sun Oct 2 2016

    Know the signs of life-threatening anaphylaxis from ‘bee sting allergies’

    As summer gives way to crispness in the air, Southerners fill the time before winter with picnics, hiking and sporting events. Flying, stinging insects are getting more active, too, leaving people who might not realize they have life-threatening allergies vulnerable to stings. “Fall in the South is an ideal time for dinners on the deck, outdoor concerts and football games. But those are all areas that attract yellow jackets, wasps and other scavenger insects that are more aggressive this time of year,” said Stokes Peebles, M.D., of the Vanderbilt Asthma, Sinus and Allergy Program. “While...

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  • Sun Oct 2 2016

    Rooting out the rats: Pests making inroads into Yuma region

    Roof rats, a pest reportedly spreading throughout the Phoenix metro area, have also made serious inroads into Yuma over the last few years, setting up shop in yards or, in the unluckiest cases, nesting inside houses and leaving a costly mess on the owner's hands. Known for their ability to climb trees to reach citrus and other fruit, as well as the roofs of neighboring buildings, the rats are notoriously difficult to eradicate from an area once they're established because of their ability to stay out of the reach of predators. They can slip through holes in walls as small as half an inch...

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  • Sat Oct 1 2016

    Health Canada launches inspections database for pesticide companies

    Health Canada has announced that information on inspections of companies that manufacture pest control products will now be available to the public in an online database. Canadians can search the Pest Control Registrant Inspections Database for specific inspection findings, as well as summary report cards from inspections and information about companies' history of compliance with the Pest Control Products Act and its Regulations. The launch of the Pest Control Products Registrant Inspections Database is a milestone under Health Canada's Regulatory Transparency and Openness Framework ...

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  • Sat Oct 1 2016

    Lake Forest Elementary employees putting out pest traps to find source of skin irritations

    Saddleback Valley Unified School District staff members planned to place pest control traps around the Lake Forest Elementary School campus in an ongoing attempt to identify the source of skin irritations – possibly bug bites – on students and staff, district officials said Friday. The traps will be placed instead of a second round of pesticide spraying and the school has closed the fields on campus. “Our agency partners have not approved any additional spraying of pesticide until the source of the problem has been identified,” Tammy Blakely, assistant to superintendent Clint Harwick,...

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  • Fri Sep 30 2016

    Birth Control Meets Pest Control in Food and Beverage Plants

    The harbor in Hamilton, Ontario, links the city to Lake Ontario and to the St. Lawrence Seaway and the world. It’s a great transport option for food commodities like sugar. Sugar in supersacks and in bulk arrive on one Hamilton pier, where end loaders convey 25,000 tons a year to a warehouse and deposit it on the floor in mounds topping 6 ft. in height. The raw sugar will later be pasteurized and filtered to 99.5 percent purity before being converted to liquid sugar, primarily for use in carbonated soft drinks. The facility is BRC certified, proof that a pest control program is in pla...

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  • Fri Sep 30 2016

    California proposes pesticide buffer zones around schools and day cares

    Crop dusting and many other forms of pesticide spraying will be banned within a quarter of a mile of schools and child day-care centers during the bulk of daylight hours, under a rule proposed by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. The proposed regulation, which would take effect next September, is the first statewide rule governing how pesticides can be applied in areas where farms lie close to facilities where children congregate. It would affect about 3,500 schools and day-care facilities and involve about 2,500 growers in California, according to the department. “Th...

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  • Fri Sep 30 2016

    West Nile cases in area limited to animals, insects so far

    There has been West Nile virus activity in the Champaign County area since late July, but the only positive test results this year have turned up in dead birds and mosquito batches. The state on Wednesday reported three West Nile-related deaths, all in Cook County. Those three people tested positive this month, and were among 64 human cases of West Nile in the state to date this year. Statewide, 52 counties, including Champaign, have had the virus appear in birds, mosquitoes, horses and/or people, according to the Illinois Department of Public Health. Elsewhere in East Central Illi...

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  • Thu Sep 29 2016

    Mystery rash at elementary school: Dozens attacked by ‘biting, stinging insects’ in Lake Forest

    Was your kid a rash victim at an Orange County school? A recent rash outbreak at a Lake Forest elementary school where students and staff have been afflicted prompted live pest testings Wednesday, a spokeswoman for Saddleback Valley Unified School District said. The source of the rashes is a serious whodunit, said Jared Dever of the Vector Control District. “Dozens of traps have been laid for the past week and a half,” he said. “What we’re looking for is a wide variety of biting or stinging insects.” After an initial investigation of the campus, “we ruled out mosquitoes and othe...

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  • Wed Sep 28 2016

    Miami-Dade County Releases Sites Where Zika Mosquitoes Captured on Miami Beach

    Miami-Dade County officials have released the locations of mosquito traps that captured Zika-positive insects in Miami Beach. Five locations - 932 Lenox Avenue, 1619 Meridian Avenue, 2000 Convention Center Drive, 2378 Prairie Avenue and 1236 Drexel Avenue - tested positive for Zika after mosquito traps were placed there, Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control officials said Wednesday. Each location tested positive only once, on August 22nd and 23rd and September 4th and 9th, officials said. Later tests on mosquitoes trapped at the locations turned up negative for Zika. "What's importan...

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  • Tue Sep 27 2016

    died in a building crawl space Friday

    BATON ROUGE - A preliminary autopsy of a 31-year-old man who found the pest control worker fell while on the job, leading to his death. The coroner's office said Joseph Bassett died from a "fracture of the neck due to blunt force injury to the head due to a fall." The autopsy was performed Monday. It is believed Bassett slipped and fell while working in a building near the corner of Lobdell and Jefferson Highway Friday afternoon. Concerned people called 911 after Bassett was seen going into the crawl space and, after lengthy period of time, had still not come out. Emergency crews r...

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  • Tue Sep 27 2016

    Scientists discover how insect-borne viruses 'suppress' the immune system to cause disease

    Arboviruses – viruses transmitted by insects such as mosquitoes – pose a considerable threat to both human and animal health. Despite that, not enough is known about the complex interactions between the virus and the host, particularly in the early stages of infection. Now, research led by the University of Glasgow has discovered how arboviruses are able to suppress the immune system responses in the initial stages of infection. The findings, which are published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), could aid better understanding of how arboviruses cause dis...

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  • Tue Sep 27 2016

    This Is the Worst Insect Sting in the World

    One day while Justin Schmidt was riding his bicycle, something went terribly wrong. “I was huffing and puffing, so my mouth was open, and this damn honeybee flew right in and stung me on the tongue,” he says. He tumbled to the ground, flailing in agony. Later he described the sting as “immediate, noisome, visceral, debilitating. For 10 minutes, life is not worth living.” It wasn’t the worst sting possible (we’ll get to that), but its intensity surprised him—which is surprising in itself, because Schmidt, a University of Arizona entomologist, has been stung over a thousand times and is...

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  • Mon Sep 26 2016

    Cockroaches are not radiation-proof and most are not pests

    Reputation: Yuck. Cockroaches are filthy, immortal scavengers that are unaffected by radiation. In a post-apocalyptic world, it will be these dirty little critters that survive. We would be better off without them. Reality: There are almost 5,000 species of cockroaches, of which only around 30 have any pest-like tendencies. These few malign a group of insects that boasts an astonishing, enriching diversity of forms. Cockroaches are pretty well toasted by radiation. The sight of a cockroach scuttling across the kitchen floor is distinctly unsavoury. This emotional truth has led most of...

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  • Sun Sep 25 2016

    Emerald ash borers continue their march through Wisconsin

    TOWN OF FULTON—Like a zombie plague, emerald ash borers continue their relentless attack on Wisconsin's ash trees, and it's only a matter of time before they blanket the state, an entomologist said. The town of Fulton recently was added to the ever-growing list of municipalities where the beetle has been found. Rock County is among dozens of counties that have been quarantined to help reduce the speed of the infestation, said P.J. Liesch, director of UW-Madison's insect diagnostics lab. “In a case like this, there's so many trees that are infested …” Liesch said. “There are simply ...

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  • Sun Sep 25 2016

    SenesTech IPO - Humane Pest Control For The Future

    Summary SenesTech is ready to commercialize its non-lethal rodent pest control compound. The worldwide pest control market is large and growing. It plans to monetize its technology through a royalty revenue model. Distributor partners will have to sell quite a lot for SenesTech to benefit, due to low royalty rates. Avoid the IPO but watch the company as it builds out its pipeline. Quick Take SenesTech (Pending:SNES) wants to raise up to $31.75 million in an IPO for its ContraPest rodent population control technologies. We don't know IPO valuation or revenue forecasts...

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  • Fri Sep 23 2016

    Insect Common Names

    Many insects have names. These names fall into one of two groups: common names or scientific names. Names generally used by the public for specific insects are known as common names and sometimes vary from place to place. All insects that have been discovered by scientists also have a two-word moniker known as a scientific name. Those two words represent the genus and species notation used in scientific classification. The person who first describes a plant or animal assigns the scientific name. That person selects the two words for the name. Those words are often based on Greek or Latin...

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  • Wed Sep 21 2016

    Junkie Ants Show That Insects Can Be Addicts, Too

    The temporary euphoria associated with opioids comes at a steep price: heroin, oxycodone, opium, morphine and other painkilling drugs are some of the highly addictive culprits fueling the drug epidemic that is sweeping America. On average, opioids claim the lives of 78 people in the U.S. each day. Now, in a bid to understand more about substance abuse and how it affects people neurochemically, researchers are turning to some unlikely addicts: Ants. As it turns out, humans aren’t the only animals who can fall hard for these drugs. Ants love them, too—maybe even more than sugar. In a paper...

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  • Wed Sep 21 2016

    UF/IFAS study: Bringing bugs to the classroom makes everyone smarter

    GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Through a curriculum appropriately titled, “Bed Bugs and Book Bags,” students worldwide are learning how to identify bed bugs, where they hide out and much more. The program teaches how to prevent the insects, and a new University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences study shows the hands-on learning experience works. The project started in 2012 in Duval County Public Schools and teaches the public how to know if the insect is indeed a bed bug and then how to deal with it. As measured by students’ increased knowledge of bed bugs, the curriculum succe...

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