PESTS  >  PESTS IN THE NEWS
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  • Wed Sep 17 2014

    Entomologist says expect more spiders inside as weather turns cooler

    This is the time of year when the Kansas State University entomology department receives a lot of calls. The question most asked: Why am I getting so many spiders in my house? "Insects move inside the house seeking warmer temperatures," said Jeff Whitworth, assistant professor of entomology. "Just like humans, insects prefer a climate around 72 degrees Fahrenheit. Spiders are seeking those warmers environments as well as searching for food." Tennessee medical officials have reported an increase in brown recluse bites this year. However, Whitworth says there is no indication there are ...

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  • Wed Sep 17 2014

    Insect Spotlight: A universal fear of spiders

    Even the most hardened entomologists are sometimes creeped out by spiders. My research team and I were running a test in the laboratory. Some time ago, we were feeding corn rootworm larvae to wolf spiders in Petri dishes (rootworms are the most expensive pest in the world to control, and happen to have some interesting anti-predator defenses). Wolf spiders are harmless to humans, but they are quick little devils. Often, the spider would dash out of the dish and directly into our laps. Although we reminded ourselves that our study subjects were "more scared of us than we are of them," we ...

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  • Wed Sep 17 2014

    Mother and young son flee home after wasps' nest falls through living room roof

    Emma, 22, and son Cody, inspect the hole where the wasps (right) came from. (SWNS) Yahoo News. - Emma, 22, and son Cody, inspect the hole where the wasps (right) came from. (SWNS) Terrified mother Emma Thickbroom had to flee her own living room - after a wasps’ nest fell through her roof ‘just like a horror film’. Emma, 22, had been hearing a ticking sound in her living room wall for a few months - but put it down to just a leak. But last Wednesday evening, her house in Wednesfield, West Mids, was invaded with thousands of the winged insects while she sat watching TV. Emma sa...

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  • Wed Sep 17 2014

    Rats Expected to Come Out When Uptown Buildings Come Down

    Wilson Red Line Station Rehab View Full Caption UPTOWN — Once the wrecking ball starts swinging, the rats come out — that's just a fact of life when it comes to demolition projects in a big city. And the CTA's $203 million makeover of the Wilson Red Line will be no exception, officials said. Ald. James Cappleman (46th) and the Chicago Transit Authority held a community meeting Tuesday about the Red Line project to let Uptown residents know how demolition and construction could affect them once the project starts this fall, and one major concern was rats. Adeshina Emmanuel says Upto...

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  • Tue Sep 16 2014

    'Moths' And 'Cockroaches' A Lighting Designer's Greatest Pests

    Melissa Block talks to David Grindle for our Trade Lingo series to find out why lighting designers talk about "moths" and "cockroaches."

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  • Tue Sep 16 2014

    Insects pose serious threat to horses

    Clemson University USDA Cooperative Extension State agriculture officials are warning horse owners to be on the lookout for mosquito and beetle borne illnesses. There have been a number of cases of eastern equine encephalitis and the West Nile virus in horses in the state this year. The first case of equine encephalitis was reported July 22, the most recent Sept. 5. Cases have been reported in Acadia, Beauregard, Evangeline and Vermilion parishes. Horses are infected the same way humans would be, by being bitten by infected mosquitoes. More cases may spring up in the next co...

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  • Tue Sep 16 2014

    New legislation would speed up approval of products that control bee pests

    WASHINGTON, Sept. 15, 2014 - As concerns continue about the U.S. bee population, lawmakers are looking at new legislation that would expedite the registration of products intended to improve pollinator health by controlling the Varroa mite, a detrimental pest to the honey bee. Congressman Austin Scott, R-Ga., introduced H.R. 5447 last week, which would amend the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), the federal legislation regulating the crop protection industry. Scott, the chairman of the House Agriculture Committee's Subcommittee on Horticulture, Research, Biot...

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  • Tue Sep 16 2014

    Technology Reshapes Pest Control

    Extermination of rodents, insects and other pests drawn to food and beverage facilities seems like a low-tech exercise. But make no mistake: Technology more closely associated with NASA than pest remediation is beginning to reshape the way these prerequisite programs are executed. Technology’s impact already is being felt, but bigger changes are coming, pest control professionals agree. “Better monitoring through electronics was being talked about five or six years ago, but the sensors and other hardware were too cumbersome and expensive,” notes Ron Harrison, director of technical servic...

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  • Tue Sep 16 2014

    These Decoy Insects Zap the Nasty Bugs That Try to Mate With Them

    As they say, sex has consequences, even for male beetles. In their quest to eradicate an invasive beetle, scientists have created "femme fatale" decoys that lure the males in and zap 'em dead—just as the unsuspecting males think they might be getting it on. The fight against the emerald ash borer, an invasive beetle that has killed tens of millions of trees in the U.S., is in dire need of new strategies. Insecticides are nasty and potentially damaging to the tree. And so far, the emerald ash borer has show zero signs of slowing its destructive spread across the U.S. A group of scienti...

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  • Tue Sep 16 2014

    Wil-Kil Pest Control celebrates nine decades in business

    Posted on September 15, 2014 Wil-Kil Pest Control may be an industry leader serving thousands of clients across the upper Midwest, but it still has plenty of small town hospitality and accessibility. And those qualities are evident in the fact that Wil-Kil this month celebrates its 90th year in business. The company's humble beginning dates back to 1924 when Irwin Klein opened a small service center with a handful of employees in Milwaukee. Klein eventually sold the company to Henry Turrie, who is credited as the “founding father” of Wil-Kil. Under Turrie's guidance, Wil-Kill exper...

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  • Mon Sep 15 2014

    A Terrifying Look Inside a Massive Hornets' Nest

    There's only one way to comfortably observe the inside of a hornet's nest: through a video on YouTube. A large group of European hornets conveniently built its nest on Redditor Redararis' window, giving us a safe (yet terrifying) view inside. Even more disturbing than watching the insects is the sound of the scurrying through their nest, so make sure you turn up your volume (or turn it off it you don't want your nightmares to be haunted by the buzzing and tiny footsteps). In the original Reddit thread, Redararis states he has no problem with the hornets because "winter is coming an...

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  • Mon Sep 15 2014

    Denville man marks 40-year career in urban entomology

    DENVILLE TWP. - William A. Kolbe of Denville, technical director for Viking Termite and Pest Control, just celebrated 40 years in the pest control industry. After graduating with a degree in entomology from the University of Delaware in 1974, Kolbe started in the structural pest control/urban entomology industry as a service supervisor. Kolbe is the author of one chapter of the “Mallis Handbook of Pest Control,” Chapter 14: Flies. He was also the Chairman of the National Pest Management Association Rodent Committee in 1988, the Chairman of the Copesan Technical Committee in 1984, a...

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  • Sun Sep 14 2014

    Bed bug infestations on the rise — even in clean places

    HEALTH STOCKTON — It’s time for bed bugs to come out from under the covers. The stigma surrounding bed bugs needs to go away. The idea that only dirty people or cluttered homes attract the biting parasites is a myth. Or that they only only in your bed. Or that they come out only at night. Wherever people congregate — apartments, mansions, doctors’ offices, dormitories, retirement homes — the blood-sucking pests are sure to follow. It’s simple, really. They survive on our blood, and they can live for many months without feeding. They don’t spread disease, they don’t jump or fly, ...

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  • Sun Sep 14 2014

    Bug spray for a home invader? How about a Winchester Widowmaker instead

    Photo Source Modern-Prepper.com If you were offended by Vice President Joe Biden’s advice to get a double-barrel shotgun to thwart home invaders, NBC offered another option: bug spray. Retired New York City police detective Wallace Zeins told NBC’s “Today” that wasp spray is an effective way to stop an intruder, according to The Blaze. “Buy a can of wasp hornet spray in the hardware store or the supermarket, [and] keep it by your bedside or the floor,” he said. “It’s more powerful than police Mace.” Black firefighter cries racism, police misconduct to media; body-cam proves h...

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  • Sat Sep 13 2014

    Dog sniffs out one of the world’s most destructive pests at Atlanta airport

    The world’s most destructive insect pest of grain products and seeds was sniffed out at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport by a U.S. Customs and Border Protection agriculture detector dog. Regal, the agriculture detector dog, alerted luggage from a Sudanese passenger. The CBP K9 handler then referred the passenger to a secondary agriculture examination. During that examination, a CBP agriculture specialist discovered dried pigeon peas in the luggage that contained a live larva and cast skins. CBP submitted the insect to the U.S. Department of Agriculture entomologist for...

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  • Sat Sep 13 2014

    Former pest control official accused of skimming $70,000 worth of insecticide in central Utah

    SALT LAKE CITY — A former pest-control official in central Utah is facing allegations that he skimmed county supplies of bug spray and resold them, pocketing about $70,000. The retired mosquito abatement director from Sevier County sold pesticide to other counties and cities and well as farmers at a discount, Sheriff Nathan Curtis said. "It's too bad. It just really stings us all," Curtis said. John P. Johnson is facing 11 theft, fraud and corruption charges. Johnson, 67, is accused of altering records to inflate the amount of bug spray used by his crews beginning in 2009, then sel...

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  • Fri Sep 12 2014

    Newly Discovered Planthopper Appendage Doesn’t Fit the Bauplan

    Although the world of insects is incredibly diverse, there are some morphological characteristics that all adult winged insects have shared in common for hundreds of millions of years. For example, all of them have five-segmented heads, three-segmented thoraxes with three pairs of legs, and 11-segmented abdomens. Any appendages that appear on their abdomens have been found to have something to do with copulation … until very recently. For the first time ever, scientists from Germany and Israel have found an appendage on planthoppers in the Bennini tribe that has nothing to do with cop...

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  • Fri Sep 12 2014

    Protecting Bee Health is a Long-Term Commitment

    U.S. Congressman Austin Scott (GA-08), Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee’s Subcommittee on Horticulture, Research, Biotechnology and Foreign Agriculture for Valdosta Today: For those in agriculture, harvest season is a busy time. Farmers nurture their fields all year, which leads to feeding our families and much of the world. Most growers involved in horticulture production know that their long hours are matched by the non-stop effort of bees, which remain a critical component of our nation’s food supply. The harvest of fruits, nuts, vegetables, ornamentals, and greenhouse crop...

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  • Thu Sep 11 2014

    Ask an Expert: Who handles pests in my co-op?

    I just found a mouse in the kitchen of my co-op. Will the super take care of this or is it my responsibility to call an exterminator? Where are the mice coming from? That’s what you’ll have to figure out before deciding who should call in pest control, our experts say, but more likely than not, it will be the co-op board's job. “The obligation of the occupant in control, i.e., the apartment owner, does not require him or her to exterminate common areas, and if that is where the mice are coming from, it would be the co-op's responsibility under the housing maintenance code,” says Steve...

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  • Thu Sep 11 2014

    If you're scared of insects or reptiles, this might help

    JAKARTA, INDONESIA - OCTOBER 27: A python lays on the bed at Bali Heritage Reflexology and Spa rooms on October 27, 2013 in Jakarta, Indonesia. The snake spa offers a unique massage treatment which involves having several pythons placed on the customers body. The movement of the snakes and the adrenaline triggered by fear is said to have a positive impact on the customers metabolism. (Photo by Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)(Photo: Ulet Ifansasti Getty Images) LITTLETON - On Thursday, 9NEWS continued Fear Week by talking about insects and reptiles. Both are on the top 10 listof fears among ...

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