Showing 1 - 20 of 1663 Results

  • Fri May 6 2016

    Gulf Coast could be ground zero for Zika

    The Gulf Coast may know hurricanes, but this year the region of 60 million people could find itself unprepared and at ground zero for a different type of storm: a mosquito-borne Zika epidemic. A look at the region's urban hubs, small towns and rural outposts shows a patchwork of preparedness. Cities such as Houston have robust plans in place, while smaller towns, such as Corpus Christi, Texas, struggle with fewer resources. The Gulf Coast's steamy climate, abundant mosquitoes and international airports create an environment ripe for the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which has spread to 3...

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  • Wed May 4 2016

    Infrequently Asked Questions: Why do so many bugs hit my windshield?

    The world is full of questions we all want answers to but are either too embarrassed, time-crunched or intimidated to actually ask. In the spirit of that shared experience, we've embarked on a journey to answer all of the questions that burn in the minds of Philadelphians — everything from universal curiosities (Why do disposable coffee cups still leak?) to Philly-specific musings (How does one clean the Liberty Bell?). If you've driven through a rural area, you're painfully familiar with the experience of having your squeaky clean car pelted by a smattering of insects, whose innards sud...

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  • Tue May 3 2016

    What Happened To The Mosquito-Zapping Laser That Was Going To Stop Malaria?

    Six years ago at TED, former Microsoft CTO and general genius Nathan Myhrvold demonstrated a "photonic fence" that uses lasers to track and obliterate disease-carrying mosquitoes. Everyone got so excited (even this site), about the potential of ending the malaria crisis with such a simple display of anti-mosquito aggression. Six years later, it seems that mosquitoes are still flying, unmolested by deadly lasers. So what happened to the idea? Did it fly, or enter the trash can of history? The answer is that the project is doing quite well—but perhaps not in the revolutionary manner ...

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  • Mon May 2 2016

    New Knowledge and a New Tool to Help Control Billbugs in Turfgrass

    By Leslie Mertz Turfgrass covers three times more land area than any other irrigated crop in the United States, and brings in tens of billions of dollars in annual revenues. Yet one of the major pests of this crop still remains a mystery in many parts of the country, according to Madeleine Dupuy, lead author of a new Journal of Integrated Pest Management article on this damaging insect. The insects are billbugs, a type of weevil that is found from southern Canada to Mexico, as well as parts of the Caribbean. “The information on billbugs is very regionally limited, so if you’re living ...

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  • Mon May 2 2016

    Researchers team up with viruses to evolve a better insecticide | ExtremeTech

    Evolution never really sits still. Under selective pressure, like an insect being exposed to pesticides, life does what it does best: figure out how to persist through adversity. Insects are becoming resistant to our pesticides faster than we can come up with new ones. Worse, some pesticides have downstream effects we didn’t plan for — q.v. our continuing refinement of allowable agricultural use of neonicotinoids in light of their apparent effect on bees. Bacillus thuringiensis makes a selective, relatively safe insecticide, to which insects are becoming less and less susceptible. So wha...

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  • Sat Apr 30 2016

    What’s the Most Painful Sting? An Interview with ‘the King of Sting’

    I met entomologist Justin Schmidt by chance in an Arizona ghost town. I was there to write a story about how the monsoon brings out tons of bizarre-looking creatures and the naturalists who chase them. Schmidt, one of those colorful bug-lovers, was relaxing with his family and, of course, running after insects. Cow-killers, to be exact. These red, fuzzy-looking wasps are renowned for their painful stings. But exactly how painful? And how does this compare with something more common, like a honeybee? Well, thanks to Schmidt, now we know. The entomologist created the Schmidt Sting Pain ...

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  • Fri Apr 29 2016

    Auditors say Albuquerque company overcharged the city

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) – The city thinks it has finally gotten rid of a pesky problem concerning a pest control company it used for nearly 20 years. KRQE News 13 learned the city of Albuquerque ditched B&Y Pest Control over fears it had been cheating the city. According to a recent audit, a handful of city departments suspected the company of “inaccurate billings, unperformed services, and falsified records.” The audit also stated the city paid B&Y more than $105,000 for pest control services during the 18 month audit period. The audit lasted from July 1, 2013 to December 31, 201...

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  • Thu Apr 28 2016

    Valley pest control worker mauled by pit bulls while on the job

    A valley pest control worker almost lost his hands in a recent dog attack. "I could start seeing all the tendons when I was moving my fingers and I could see the tendons moving with my own eyes, there was no skin left," said Scott Fieger of the violent attack. Fieger has been a pest control worker for 25 years. He didn't hear any dogs barking and the gate was unlocked, so he headed into the backyard of a home near Clayton Street and Lone Mountain Road in North Las Vegas on April 25 to spray like he was hired to. "These two loose pit bulls, the aggressors, they both came around and ...

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  • Wed Apr 27 2016

    Varroa Mite Infestation In US Worse Than Previously Believed: Multi-Year Study

    The first multi-year honeybee disease study in the United States has revealed that varroa mite infestations in the country are far worse than what was previously believed, as the population of the deadly pests is more abundant than ever. Scientists from the Department of Agriculture and the University of Maryland conducted the research to look into the ill effects of diseases that plague honeybees in the United States, including varroa mites, fungal gut parasites and several other debilitating viruses. Their results provided a crucial five-year baseline against which to track future tren...

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  • Wed Apr 27 2016

    Vegan restaurants struggle with quandary of pest control

    As more fine dining meat-free restaurants are cropping up, establishment owners are struggling to balance humane ways to kill unwanted pests and their no-kill values. Here, Melanie Cochran works the cash register at her vegetarian restaurant, The Wild Cow, in Nashville, Tenn. Mark Humphrey | AP Even the well-being of rats, roaches and spiders are a concern for animal activists. But they also pose ethical dilemmas for owners of vegan restaurants who need to keep those pests out of their kitchens while trying to abide by no-kill values. Melanie Cochran, owner of The Wild Cow Vegetarian ...

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  • Mon Apr 25 2016

    Bedbugs are drawn to certain colors, study finds

    (CNN)The next time you're packing for a trip, you might want to reach for your brightest-colored luggage. It could help keep bedbugs away. A new study finds that bedbugs -- just like flies and other insects -- have favorite colors. They really like dark red and black, and they shun dazzling white and bright yellow. Researchers placed bedbugs in Petri dishes that contained little bug-sized tents made of different colored paper. The bugs quickly crawled to the shelter, just as you would expect for insects that spend 90% of their lives hiding in cracks and crevices. But when given the ch...

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  • Fri Apr 22 2016

    Rats on AI’s Dreamliner cause flight nightmares

    It's the third time this year that an AI flight has had to be diverted, though Jet, Spice, Indigo fumigated by the same agency haven't faced rodent issues. A complaint has been lodged and a probe ordered. For the third time in three weeks, an Air India flight has had to be diverted because of a rat on a plane. Last Saturday, April 16, the Boeing 787 Dreamliner headed from Melbourne to Delhi had to make an unscheduled landing in Singapore. A mere five days prior Delhi travellers bound for Frankfurt were deplaned and on April 4, a Birmingham flight to Delhi also had an unannounced and unwe...

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  • Tue Apr 19 2016

    Insects Have Consciousness, Self-Awareness and Egos

    Insects are conscious, egocentric beings, according to a new paper that also helps to explain why and likely when consciousness first evolved. Recent neuroimaging suggests insects are fully hardwired for both consciousness and egocentric behavior, providing strong evidence that organisms from flies to fleas exhibit both. Consciousness comes in many levels, and researchers say that insects have the capacity for at least one basic form: subjective experience. “When you and I are hungry, we don't just move towards food; our hunger also has a particular feeling associated with it,” Col...

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  • Thu Apr 14 2016

    Why Bed Bugs Are Getting Harder to Kill

    Bed bugs are among the most dreaded pests we have to deal with, and they're proving to be a formidable foe. New research suggests that bed bugs are able to ward off insecticides by developing thicker skins. Bedrooms across the world are in the midst of a bed bug epidemic. This plague of bloodsucking parasites has caused incalculable discomfort and paranoia , leaving their unwary victims with irritated skin and a profound sense of the willies. Each year, the United States spends $250 million to combat the bugs, with little progress to show for it. Part of the problem has to do with thi...

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  • Wed Apr 13 2016

    Newspaper reporter, broadcaster and pest control worker ranked among the worst jobs of 2016

    Who has the worst job in America? According to CareerCast.com’s 28th annual Jobs Rated report’s 10 worst jobs list, it’s a newspaper reporter. The Jobs Rated report’s methodology analyzes each job’s environment (emotional, physical and hours worked), income (growth potential and salary), outlook (employment growth, income growth potential and unemployment), and 11 stress factors to determine which professions are among the least desirable. “A gradual decline in print publications at the turn of the century became a steep downturn for the past decade,” CareerCast writes in what is f...

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  • Wed Apr 13 2016

    University of Missouri Extension: How to deal with tunneling pests in your yard

    The days are getting warmer, which means destructive, furry varmints are busy tearing up lawns and damaging plants. It’s time once again for moles and voles to go after your lawn and garden. “A mole will generally remain underground and not come to the surface, but most people are familiar with the damage they do with their feeding tunnels and the molehills that they make,” said Brad Fresenburg, assistant professor of plant sciences for University of Missouri Extension. “Most homeowners will notice a network of tunnels that have these 1 1/2-inch- to 2-inch diameter holes where they...

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  • Tue Apr 12 2016

    Garden-care giant to drop chemicals linked to bee declines

    DENVER (AP) -- Garden-care giant Ortho said Tuesday that it will stop using a class of chemicals widely believed to harm bees as concerns rise about the health of the insects that pollinate a big portion of plants that people eat. The company plans to phase out neonicotinoids by 2021 in eight products used to control garden pests and diseases. It will change three products for roses, flowers, trees and shrubs by 2017 and other products later, said Tim Martin, vice president and general manager of Ortho, a division of Marysville, Ohio-based Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. The chemicals, called ...

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  • Mon Apr 11 2016

    You Can Help Stop These Deadly Mosquitoes

    Lions and tigers and bears, oh my! From rabid dogs and bats killing around 59,000 people a year to snake bites killing 100,000 and disabling many more, toothy vertebrates haunt humanity’s dreams for good reason. But death tolls from fanged beasts pale in comparison to the havoc mosquitoes wreak. Between malaria, dengue and yellow fever, the World Health Organization chalks up millions of annual deaths to the insect. One specific type of mosquito out of around 3,500 species, the Aedes aegypti spreads these diseases and has made headlines in the wake of increased microcephaly cases almost ...

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  • Sun Apr 10 2016

    Wildlife babies found alone rarely need our help

    From the UI Wildlife Medical Clinic Wildlife babies found alone rarely need our help Each spring, wildlife babies are taken from the wild by well-meaning people who believe the animals have been abandoned by their parents. Although it may be human nature to want to rescue an animal that looks like it needs help, the truth is wild babies rarely need human assistance. The Wildlife Medical Clinic at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine in Urbana wants people to know more about when and how to help wildlife babies. A wildlife baby that is not with its parent ...

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  • Sat Apr 9 2016

    When wasps ATTACK: Experts reveal why the evil insects target you, how to avoid being stung and whether killing one will cause an army to swarm

    If you've ever been stung by a bee or wasp, you might think the attack came out of nowhere, but bees and wasps will only sting when they feel threatened. They are social animals and often their attacks are as a response to a particular chemical given off by other members of their hive. Now the science behind these attacks have been explained in a video by The American Chemical Society. Scroll down for video Honeybees (pictured) and wasps will only sting when they feel threatened. They are social animals and often their attacks are as a response to a particular chemical given off...

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