Showing 1 - 20 of 1770 Results

  • Tue Sep 27 2016

    died in a building crawl space Friday

    BATON ROUGE - A preliminary autopsy of a 31-year-old man who found the pest control worker fell while on the job, leading to his death. The coroner's office said Joseph Bassett died from a "fracture of the neck due to blunt force injury to the head due to a fall." The autopsy was performed Monday. It is believed Bassett slipped and fell while working in a building near the corner of Lobdell and Jefferson Highway Friday afternoon. Concerned people called 911 after Bassett was seen going into the crawl space and, after lengthy period of time, had still not come out. Emergency crews r...

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  • Tue Sep 27 2016

    Scientists discover how insect-borne viruses 'suppress' the immune system to cause disease

    Arboviruses – viruses transmitted by insects such as mosquitoes – pose a considerable threat to both human and animal health. Despite that, not enough is known about the complex interactions between the virus and the host, particularly in the early stages of infection. Now, research led by the University of Glasgow has discovered how arboviruses are able to suppress the immune system responses in the initial stages of infection. The findings, which are published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), could aid better understanding of how arboviruses cause dis...

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  • Tue Sep 27 2016

    This Is the Worst Insect Sting in the World

    One day while Justin Schmidt was riding his bicycle, something went terribly wrong. “I was huffing and puffing, so my mouth was open, and this damn honeybee flew right in and stung me on the tongue,” he says. He tumbled to the ground, flailing in agony. Later he described the sting as “immediate, noisome, visceral, debilitating. For 10 minutes, life is not worth living.” It wasn’t the worst sting possible (we’ll get to that), but its intensity surprised him—which is surprising in itself, because Schmidt, a University of Arizona entomologist, has been stung over a thousand times and is...

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  • Mon Sep 26 2016

    Cockroaches are not radiation-proof and most are not pests

    Reputation: Yuck. Cockroaches are filthy, immortal scavengers that are unaffected by radiation. In a post-apocalyptic world, it will be these dirty little critters that survive. We would be better off without them. Reality: There are almost 5,000 species of cockroaches, of which only around 30 have any pest-like tendencies. These few malign a group of insects that boasts an astonishing, enriching diversity of forms. Cockroaches are pretty well toasted by radiation. The sight of a cockroach scuttling across the kitchen floor is distinctly unsavoury. This emotional truth has led most of...

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  • Sun Sep 25 2016

    Emerald ash borers continue their march through Wisconsin

    TOWN OF FULTON—Like a zombie plague, emerald ash borers continue their relentless attack on Wisconsin's ash trees, and it's only a matter of time before they blanket the state, an entomologist said. The town of Fulton recently was added to the ever-growing list of municipalities where the beetle has been found. Rock County is among dozens of counties that have been quarantined to help reduce the speed of the infestation, said P.J. Liesch, director of UW-Madison's insect diagnostics lab. “In a case like this, there's so many trees that are infested …” Liesch said. “There are simply ...

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  • Sun Sep 25 2016

    SenesTech IPO - Humane Pest Control For The Future

    Summary SenesTech is ready to commercialize its non-lethal rodent pest control compound. The worldwide pest control market is large and growing. It plans to monetize its technology through a royalty revenue model. Distributor partners will have to sell quite a lot for SenesTech to benefit, due to low royalty rates. Avoid the IPO but watch the company as it builds out its pipeline. Quick Take SenesTech (Pending:SNES) wants to raise up to $31.75 million in an IPO for its ContraPest rodent population control technologies. We don't know IPO valuation or revenue forecasts...

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  • Fri Sep 23 2016

    Insect Common Names

    Many insects have names. These names fall into one of two groups: common names or scientific names. Names generally used by the public for specific insects are known as common names and sometimes vary from place to place. All insects that have been discovered by scientists also have a two-word moniker known as a scientific name. Those two words represent the genus and species notation used in scientific classification. The person who first describes a plant or animal assigns the scientific name. That person selects the two words for the name. Those words are often based on Greek or Latin...

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  • Wed Sep 21 2016

    Junkie Ants Show That Insects Can Be Addicts, Too

    The temporary euphoria associated with opioids comes at a steep price: heroin, oxycodone, opium, morphine and other painkilling drugs are some of the highly addictive culprits fueling the drug epidemic that is sweeping America. On average, opioids claim the lives of 78 people in the U.S. each day. Now, in a bid to understand more about substance abuse and how it affects people neurochemically, researchers are turning to some unlikely addicts: Ants. As it turns out, humans aren’t the only animals who can fall hard for these drugs. Ants love them, too—maybe even more than sugar. In a paper...

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  • Wed Sep 21 2016

    UF/IFAS study: Bringing bugs to the classroom makes everyone smarter

    GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Through a curriculum appropriately titled, “Bed Bugs and Book Bags,” students worldwide are learning how to identify bed bugs, where they hide out and much more. The program teaches how to prevent the insects, and a new University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences study shows the hands-on learning experience works. The project started in 2012 in Duval County Public Schools and teaches the public how to know if the insect is indeed a bed bug and then how to deal with it. As measured by students’ increased knowledge of bed bugs, the curriculum succe...

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  • Tue Sep 20 2016

    Bedbugs leave Garden City resident 'frustrated, paranoid'

    VIDEO Elizabeth Chernecki says she has been dealing with bedbugs in her Garden City apartment building for two years and is fed up with the pests and lack of action on the part of building management. The long-time homeowner-turned renter said that until she moved into the building at 1001 Sinclair St. just over two years ago, she didn't even know what a bedbug was. "[I'm] frustrated, paranoid, because any time you feel an itch you think it's a bedbug. I'm not sleeping well, I'm not eating well, just upset. I have to get out of here." Sixty-one-year-old Elizabeth Chernecki says ...

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  • Tue Sep 20 2016

    Insects with West Nile Virus found in Henry County, state says

    NAPOLEON — The Ohio Department of Health is confirming that mosquitoes with West Nile Virus have been found in Henry County. No human or animals have tested positive. The sample was collected from an undeveloped property on County Road S in Liberty Township, according to the Henry County Health Department, which was notified by the state health department on Friday. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, West Nile virus is commonly spread by infected mosquitoes. About 1 in 5 people who are infected will develop a fever with other symptoms. Less than one percent o...

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  • Tue Sep 20 2016

    The call of the dung: How flies find their meal

    Like many other insects, vinegar flies produce pheromones to call their conspecifics to an interesting food source. A research team of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, demonstrated in a new study that the flies' frass also contains these pheromones. Fruits that have been covered by the insects' fecal excretions seem to be especially attractive to other flies. These fruits are probably a more easily digestible food after many flies have been feeding on them. The new results are a first step toward understanding the importance of feces in the communication of vi...

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  • Tue Sep 20 2016

    With One Area Cleared Of Zika, Focus Shifts To Miami Beach

    MIAMI — With health authorities declaring a win against Zika in Miami’s Wynwood arts district, their emphasis shifts to the remaining transmission zone on nearby Miami Beach, where residents have objected to the aerial pesticide spraying crediting with halting infections. No new cases of Zika have been reported in Wynwood since early August, and on Monday health officials declared it to be no longer a zone of active local transmission. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lifted a warning for pregnant women to stay out of Wynwood altogether, but continued to caution the...

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  • Mon Sep 19 2016

    Bell Introduces New P.C.Q.® PRO

    Bell Introduces New P.C.Q.® PRO Pest Management Professionals have a new weapon in the fight against meadow and pine voles, California ground squirrels and commensal rodents with new, P.C.Q.® PRO, from Bell Laboratories. With the active ingredient, Diphacinone, this proven, first generation anticoagulant rodenticide has a broad label for use against a wide variety of pests in industrial, commercial and residential accounts. A welcomed addition to Bell's line-up of rodenticides, P.C.Q.® PRO is a restricted-use pesticide that is approved for burrow baiting for meadow and pine voles. ...

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  • Mon Sep 19 2016

    Orient Mosquito District still battling pests a century later

    In April 1916, New York State approved a law allowing each town in Suffolk County to create a special district for the purpose of exterminating mosquitoes. Five months later, Southold Town adopted legislation forming the Orient Mosquito District. Exactly one century later, the special district — which met for the first time Sept. 30, 1916, and set a $220 budget for the following year — remains the only one of its kind in the entire state. Last Saturday at Poquatuck Hall on Skipper’s Lane, four of the district’s five commissioners gathered to approve the annual budget. Shortly after th...

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  • Sat Sep 17 2016

    From Pests To Puzzle Solvers, Scientists Study Laramie's Raccoons

    It’s a dark and damp Sunday morning in Laramie, and University of Wyoming Raccoon Project team members are climbing out of a big truck on the south end of town. Undergraduate student Emily Davis puts on a headlamp and speaks into a video camera to document the day’s work. “It’s 5:40 on August 21st and we’re trapping Davis Trap One.” Three members of the team walk up to a fence where a trap is hidden beneath brush and planks. Inside is what they’ve been hoping for: a big, fat, bandit-eyed raccoon. Rachel Fanelli, one of the team members, says he looks like is a new capture. “I...

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  • Sat Sep 17 2016

    Pest control issues prompt investigation at ETX healthcare facility

    VIDEO LINDALE - The Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services is investigating a healthcare facility in Lindale following a report of field mice in the building. The investigation into the Lindale Healthcare Center began September 14 according to an official with the state agency. A complaint was filed, and the agency found there was a pest control issue that was a threat to the health and safety of the residents. The administrator of Lindale Healthcare said the facility took measures to address the issue, and says they will continue to monitor the situation. DADS...

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  • Fri Sep 16 2016

    Do Insects Sleep?

    VIDEO For scientists, sleep is such a rich area of research that entire institutes are dedicated to it. We know that humans sleep, of course. And pretty much every animal we've ever studied does, too. But what about insects? Julian Huguet investigates in today's DNews special report. In the year 2000, two separate research groups studied fruit flies to determine whether their periods of inactivity could be classified as sleep. The researchers documented some interesting observations. At night, the flies were immobile and displayed a higher arousal threshold, meaning that it took more ...

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  • Thu Sep 15 2016

    'Unusual' bee species drills apartment-style nests out of rock

    A newly discovered species of bee does things the hard way, gnawing its nests out of solid rock even when softer dirt is available. This hard work appears to pay off, however, by providing the bees greater protection from the vagaries of life in the desert Southwest. The species, dubbed , has been found in Utah, in southwest Colorado and in Death Valley in California, where it pocks vertical sandstone rock faces with tiny holes. Though the bees seem to be solitary nesters, they build these rocky alcoves next to one another, like insect apartment-dwellers. "The bee is very unusual," st...

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  • Thu Sep 15 2016

    When will the risk for Zika-carrying mosquitoes subside in the US?

    While mosquitoes are typically seen as a summertime pests in much of the country, continued warmth could mean that the insects hang around longer than usual into the fall season. According to Dr. Jim Fredericks, chief entomologist for the National Pest Management Association, as long it remains warm and humid, mosquitoes will remain a concern. "In general, warm, wet weather equals more mosquitoes," Fredericks said. A recent report on summer 2016 weather from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said that every state in the contiguous U.S. saw temperatures abov...

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