Showing 1 - 20 of 1813 Results

  • Wed Nov 16 2016

    K9 Piper has the coolest job of any dog — he chases pests off runways

    VIDEO K9 Piper is the local pest controller at Michigan airport and his dedication is unparalleled. His role is to keep birds, rabbits, and squirrels off the runways so they are clear for planes taking off and landing. The clever pooch was trained by his owner and handler Brian Edwards who keeps his fans updated with regular videos on YouTube.

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  • Tue Nov 15 2016

    Bats take up residence in UCF building

    VIDEO ORLANDO, Fla. - A colony of bats decided to take up residence in the College of Sciences building on the campus of the University of Central Florida. About 50 bats were removed from the building Monday afternoon, according to UCF communications coordinator Rachel Williams. Workers said the bats became trapped in the building while repairs were being done over the weekend. One-way exit cages will be installed by Wednesday to allow any remaining bats to leave the building while preventing them from entering back inside. "The bats did not pose a threat to building patrons, an...

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  • Mon Nov 14 2016

    Florida Facing Invasion of Tropical Bed Bugs Not Seen Since World War II

    VIDEO The United States is facing an invasion threat that the country hasn’t seen since World War II. Researchers in Florida have discovered a case of rare tropical bed bugs, which are larger and more prolific breeders than common bed bugs, on Merritt Island near the Ulumay Wildlife Sanctuary, Florida Today reports. Common female bed bugs can lay 200 eggs; tropicals lay 500, Ivan Starkey of Fort Myers Pest Control told NBC-2. "They multiply at a faster rate, they lay more eggs than are common bed bugs that we are dealing with today," he said. Though common bed bugs are, well,...

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  • Mon Nov 14 2016

    New pests, elm seed bugs, found in Utah homes

    There’s a new bug in town. Since July 2014, Utah State University Extension’s Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Lab has received numerous calls about a small brown-and-black insect gathering in and on homes. The elm seed bug, a native of Europe, was first identified in the United States in Idaho in 2012 and in Oregon in 2013. While the first samples from Utah come from Salt Lake County, the insect is likely well established along the Wasatch Front and Cache County. Elm seed bugs feed mostly on elm seeds but can be found on other trees, such as the linden. Luckily, the bugs are not a concern for...

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  • Mon Nov 14 2016

    Peacocks are terrorizing Wayne Newton’s Vegas neighborhood

    Feathers are flying in the neighborhood around Wayne Newton‘s estate, where residents are complaining that peafowl like the ones on the Las Vegas showman’s 40-acre ranch have become roosting, roaming pests. Residents who live near Casa de Shenandoah claim peafowl from the ranch wander the neighborhood — squawking, scratching family cars and creating a traffic hazard. “We heard something on our roof that scared us to death,” April Juelke told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. “We thought a burglar was breaking in, but it was a bunch of peacocks.” The Juelkes and others say the birds roo...

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  • Tue Nov 8 2016

    Children in NYC shelter are being attacked by pests, parents say

    VIDEO THE BRONX — A mother and father say their children are being attacked by fleas and rodents while they sleep. They live in a homeless shelter on Southern Boulevard in the Bronx and said they have complained multiple times but nothing has been done. "My 5-year-old can't go to school, attacked by fleas from the mice in our room. The entire building is infested," said the children's father, who did not want to be identified. They have three boys, ages 7, 4, and 3. "I see a mouse at night," their 7-year-old boy said. The father was laid off and the mother is a full-time s...

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  • Tue Nov 8 2016

    Rats! Seattle’s new regulation to ward off the pests

    Seattle is set to impose a new rat regulation aimed at the local construction industry. “Seattle is a port city, we definitely have a lot of rats,” said Leah Helms with King County’s Environment Health Rodent Program. How Seattle plans to get rid of homes with squatters That’s right, King County has its own rodent department. Seattle tops the list of American cities with the most rats, KIRO 7 reports. Seattle ranks no. 11 out of 50 on the list. “In the City of Seattle, and in King County, it’s the property owner’s responsibility to deal with their rat problems,” she said. ...

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  • Tue Nov 8 2016

    Why Do Raccoons Flourish As Urban Pests?

    In Wisconsin, like most of the country, raccoons are practically omnipresent. Their adaptability has allowed them to move from the country landscape as a wildlife creature to an urban life in cities and towns across the state. There are a few factors that make the raccoon especially adept at finding the food and shelter they need living among people, said University of Wisconsin-Madison professor David Drake. First, he explained, raccoons are cavity nesters in the wild, meaning they would typically cozy up inside old trees and similar small spaces. The tremendous number of cavities av...

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  • Mon Nov 7 2016

    FDA warning letters: Pests, debris, seafood HACCP problems

    One of the two most recently posted food-related warning letters from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration went to The Smoked Goat Co. Inc. in Havre de Grace, MD. The warning letter from the agency’s Baltimore District Office, dated Oct. 24, told the company that an inspection of its facility from Aug. 12-17 found “significant violations” of Current Good Manufacturing Practices regulations. These violations consisted of failure to store foods under conditions and controls necessary to minimize contamination, the warning letter stated. “During the current inspection, your firm was ...

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  • Fri Nov 4 2016

    DNA in dust reveals truth about bugs lurking in our homes

    Here’s a new finding that suggests no amount of housecleaning will turn your home into a bug-free oasis: More than 600 types of insects, spiders and centipedes live in most American homes. Researchers arrived at that startling number after analyzing bug DNA in dust samples collected from more than 700 homes across the continental United States. Study participants swabbed some dust from the top of a doorway inside their house or apartment. The sealed swab was sent to the researchers, who then used DNA analysis to identify every genus of bug DNA found in the samples. “That’s an incre...

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  • Fri Nov 4 2016

    Entomology expert talks pest genetics, control leading up to 2016 Whitney and Anna Harris Conservation Forum

    The bug theme continues at the University of Missouri–St. Louis. Earlier this week an entomology class donned their insect costumes for Halloween. But now the scientists and friends of the Whitney R. Harris World Ecology Center are on to more serious insect issues bugging society – mosquitoes and other pests. Raul Medina, an associate professor of entomology at Texas A&M University, will present on pest genetics and control at the 2016 Whitney and Anna Harris Conservation Forum. The topic of the upcoming 2016 Whitney and Anna Harris Conservation Forum, pests will be discussed particu...

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  • Fri Nov 4 2016

    What FSMA means for pest management

    America’s food processors play a crucial role in ensuring the safety of the food supply. The Food Safety Modernization Act of 2011 established Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls (HARPC) as the standard approach for food processors’ written food safety plans, and it has revolutionized the way that food processors look at food safety. HARPC is fundamentally a shift in approach from reactive to proactive protection of food products, especially when it comes to pests. Food processing facilities provide everything that pests need to survive: food and water, shelter and warmth....

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  • Mon Oct 31 2016

    Insects Are Scary Because Your Brain Confuses Disgust With Fear

    Why let creepy clowns get all the attention? From now until Halloween, Science of Us is investigating the psychology behind some of the most common fears. In a 2013 interview with Popular Science, ecologist Jeffrey Lockwood, author of The Infested Mind, recalled a time when he found himself caught in a massive grasshopper swarm: “I had worked with insects for years and grasshoppers for a very long period,” he said, “but [in this instance] their numbers and behavior and their overwhelming capacity conspired to generate a panic attack, which was extremely disturbing for me. I’d never had s...

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  • Sat Oct 29 2016

    What's going on under your lawn? Incredible pictures reveal elaborate maze of tunnels under neatly manicured layer of turf

    These amazing pictures reveal the chaos caused by a single mole under a neatly manicured layer of turfed lawn. Photos of the maze of tunnels in a garden in Bristol - which look like an elaborate art installation - were captured by pest control expert Adam Leonard. He went on to catch the mole with his bare hands - for the first time in his 22-year career. Mr Leonard said: 'Most people only realise they've got moles when they break through the surface and leave those little piles of earth. 'But they do untold damage to a nice lawn without doing that. 'The neatly-laid turf is p...

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  • Wed Oct 26 2016

    Global Market Study on Pest Control Products and Services: North America Expected to be the Most Attractive Regional Market

    The global pest control products and services market is expected to exhibit a healthy CAGR of 5.4% accounting for $28.6 billion in the forecast period from 2016 to 2026, according to a recent report from Persistence Market Research. Globally, the market growth of pest control products and services is driven by a quickly growing urban population worldwide beside surge in the pest population, mainly attributed towards accessible food sources for conducive living habitats and small organisms. In developed as well as developing countries, increasing awareness about health & hygiene among con...

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  • Wed Oct 26 2016

    The Bug That Stalks Spiders on Their Own Webs

    Spiders don’t make for easy prey. They are almost all venomous and almost all predatory. Many build webs whose silken lines ensure a sticky end for blundering insects. And those webs are, in a very real way, extensions of the spiders: By carrying the telltale vibrations of intruders, they act as both burglar alarm and death trap. So it’s a bold kind of insect that hunts spiders for a living, a positively foolhardy one that hunts them on their own webs, and a seemingly suicidal one that does so on foot. And yet, that’s exactly what the giraffe-necked assassin bug does. It’s a bizarr...

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  • Wed Oct 26 2016

    Zika virus 'not controllable': CDC director's grim warning

    MIAMI — The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention delivered a grim assessment Tuesday of the government's ability to contain Zika, saying it's too late to stop the dangerous virus from spreading throughout the United States. "Zika and other diseases spread by (the Aedes aegypti mosquito) are really not controllable with current technologies," CDC Director Thomas Frieden said. "We will see this become endemic in the hemisphere." Speaking at the CityLab 2016 conference in this southern city, Frieden encouraged mayors and city officials in attendance to bolster mosqu...

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  • Tue Oct 25 2016

    Rodent buffet: How Phoenix uses birds of prey to kill pests

    Ed Checkley scoured the bottom of a dry water-retention basin in northeast Phoenix recently, looking for the remains of rodents killed by the city's newest pest-control agents: hungry raptors. It's just after sunrise as Checkley uses a snake stick to poke around in the dirt for evidence of any raptor activity. No vermin debris this morning, but hoof prints offer a clue that javelinas have stopped by to help clean up. A few years ago, the city struggled to control an infestation of ground squirrels near 32nd Street and State Route 51. The burrowing rodents destroyed a nearby earthen da...

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  • Sun Oct 23 2016

    Bedbugs a growing problem in the Inland Northwest

    Getting rid of one bedbug is simple – just squish it with your finger. But getting rid of a lot of bedbugs? That’s tricky. Just ask Jason and Serenity Longacre, who live in a house with three family friends, three dogs, three cats, a bearded dragon and a snake. Their home, which they acknowledge is quite messy, is a rental in the Shadle area, sandwiched between more expensive homes with nice yards and clean porches. Several months ago, the Longacres and their guests started noticing red marks on their arms and legs that itched like mosquito bites. Then they noticed the dogs digging...

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  • Wed Oct 19 2016

    Anthranilic Diamides Can Potentially Replace Neonicotinoid Seed Treatments in Vegetable Crops

    By Rebecca A. Schmidt-Jeffris and Brian A. Nault When used as foliar sprays, neonicotinoids have caused some concern among the general public because — like any pesticide — they can harm bees and other beneficial insects. However, using neonicotinoids as seed treatments minimizes these risks, and has become a commonly used tool for proactively protecting crops from insect damage. These seed treatments have benefits that include relatively low costs, low mammalian toxicity, and reduced worker handling of pesticides. Within the processing vegetable industry, crops like snap bean are typ...

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